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PILGRIM 




J&* 



1942 





Published by the 
PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

Plymouth, Mass. 
Volume XXI No. \ 




1941 -Z)L Pd r im Staff- 1942 

Editor-in-Chief ----------------- George Canucci 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief ------------ Richard Kearsley 

Literary Editor ---------------- Jennette Franks 

Junior Literary Editor --------------- Jean Boutin 

Sophomore Literary Editor ------------- Joan Eldridge 

Business Manager ---------------- Roger Whiting 

f Loring Belcher 

Assistant Business Managers --------- <J Benjamin Brewster 

[William Lamborghini 
Sales Promotion ---------------- Edwin Bastoni 

Boys' Athletics --------------- Richard Wirtzburger 

Girls' Athletics ----------------- Florinda Leal 

Art Editor ------------------ Lydia Mongan 

Senior Assistant --------------- Marie Martinelli 

Junior Assistant ---------------- Naomi McNeil 

Sophomore Assistant -------------- Nancy Bartlett 

French Editor ------------------ Anna Scotti 

Assistant French Editor -------------- Mary Anderson 

Latin Editor ----------------- Muriel Humphrey 

Assistant Latin Editor ------------- George Radcliffe 

School News Editor --------------- Ruth Morton 

Assistant School News Editor ---------- Robert MacDonagh 

Alumni Editor ------------------ Betty Viets 

Assistant Alumni Editor --------------- David Briggs 

Clubs -------------------- Marcia Brooks 

Assistant Clubs --------------- William MacDonald 

Musicolumn ------------------ Marjorie Neal 

Faith Millman 

Senior Features - --------------- J Laura Resnick 

Joan Holmes 

Richard Gavone 

Junior Feature ----------------- Gladys Cohen 

Sophomore Feature --------------- Isabel Brown 

Edward Cavicchi 

Senior Poems --------------- J Ronald Butterfield 

Helen Shaw 
Virginia Lynch 

Candid Camera -------------- [Bernard Kritzmacher 

/ Harold Hayward 

\ Isabelle Pierson 
I Barbara Maloon 
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - Harold Maccaferri 



Typists - - - - 
Cover Photograph 




* ■ r .- ; '~ ' : ~i 




^Jk'ts book Is dedicated to those j-^li^moutk hot 
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now seri'iii,! ,/> the armed forces of tkt 



United States. 



^Jke principal ^_J peaks 
MacARTHUR and HIS MEN 

WHERE IS BAT A AN? 

PPm J -""- T""\ATAAN is in the heart of every American, m 

Jjjf"' JT~^ II ^ e heart of every liberty-loving man and 

J ' ".'* ■$ *-** woman, boy and girl, in the wide world. It is 

. J|l. Vl part of the geography of human hope. 

Hmm ^ is no mere place-name. Bataan is a shrine 

j ^^ hallowed by the blood of common men, white and 

9k brown., black and yellow, unafraid to die for 

I V~ Bataan is sacred, for here died the men whose 

L Tiirfs^ - courage, whose devotion to an ideal, will serve us 

as a beacon light in the dark days ahead. 

WHO IS MacARTHUR? 
The C.-in-C. in the Pacific, MacArthur, is all of us. MacArthur is the 
general in command and the man in the ranks; he is the man at the lathe 
and the man at the loom; the man in the pulpit and the man at the plow. 
He is you in America and your brother in the subject countries. He is the 
Dutchman and the Dane, the Slav and the Slovak, the Belgian, the French- 
man, the Briton, the Norwegian. He is Man against the Axis. 

WHAT IS MacARTHUR? 
MacArthur is the flame of faith that blazes at the tip of Freedom's 
torch. He is the spirit of a nation. He is American. 

WHO ARE HIS MEN? 
We are all his men. From the greatest to the least we are his men. So 
long as we love liberty and seek truth, whether in Bataan or Boston, he 
will know that we are his men. He must know that he can count on us. 

WHAT SHOULD WE DO ABOUT IT? 
Tell Hitler and Mussolini and the Japs. Tell them in the only language 
all three are able to comprehend. Tell them in tanks and planes and ships 
and guns. Tell them in deeds. 

WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT? 
We can do whatever is required of us; do it better than we have ever 
done it before. No matter how humble or prosaic, we can do it for him. 
What does it matter who flies the bomber as long as we can give him 
bombers to fly? Who cares what man drives the tank as long as we turn 
out tanks and train drivers? If we can forget self and serve country, if we 
can forego profit and foster patriotism, if we can "praise the Lord and pass 
the ammunition" MacArthur may yet be proud of us. 

Edgar J. Mongan 





SENIORS 



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President: Roger Whiting 

Poor Roger! . . . With all the "pressure politics" of the 
Class of 1942, he has a time of it . . . born on January 4th in 
1925 . . . has attained a height of five feet, seven inches, 
culminated by a crop of brown curls . . . according to his 
driver's license, has blue eyes . . . surprised us all by 
appearing one day wearing glasses . . . played as a substi- 
tute on the varsity basketball team in his Senior year . . . 
was an active member of the S.A.S. for three years ... is 
determined to equal last year's record of "Pilgrim" adver- 
tising . . . considered by certain members of the opposite 
sex as the best-dressed boy in the Senior class . . . finds 
spaghetti unappetizing! 



Vice-President: Edmund Axford 

Our Vice-President has light brown hair, blue eyes, and 
a height of five feet, six inches . . . ran on cross-country 
team and track . . . listed on the records as a Senior, but 
spends so much time on the Sophomore floor that we some- 
times wonder . . . admits bookkeeping is his Waterloo, but 
hastens to add that he redeems himself in history . . . let's 
see now, Eddie, was it Patrick Henry? ... is justly proud of 
his stamp collection, which consists of approximately 12,000 
items . . . loves to tinker with gadgets . . . insists he can't 
jitterbug . . . admits the desire to take the Chiltonville bus 
. . . born in 1924 on August 9th. 



Secretary: Joan Holmes 

We thought she'd never conquer the habit of talking 
with her hands, but Mrs. Raymond took care of that . . . 
only five feet, two and one-half inches (be sure to remember 
the half inch) . . . blessed with taffy-colored hair and hazel 
eyes . . . haunts Gambini's for some unknown reason . . . 
struggled with Seniors in her capacity as Red Cross Knitting 
Captain . . . loves to drop that tiny ring in History IV . . . 
was a member of the S.A.S. . . . infects everyone with her 
laugh . . . exasperates her classmates by tapping her fingers 
or jiggling her leg when trying to think . . . has to read her 
own secretary's notes because nobody else can . . . born on 
February 7th, 1924 . . . still thinks 1935 "Pilgrim" is best ever. 



Treasurer: Harold Maccaferri 

Five feet, nine inches of brawn were behind that pass — 
Yeah, "Mac"! . . . born in 1924 on the 3rd of August . . . 
wore bow ties in company with the other males, much to the 
girls' disgust . . . saved class financial worries by his con- 
stant vigilance over the treasury . . . finally did get our class 
pins to arrive . . . should be an airplane designer — certainly 
had enough experience in American History, Period IV . . . 
shocked Mrs. Raymond by revealing that we all aren't as 
honest as she'd like to believe (no reflection on you, "Mac") 
. . . worked on ticket sales promotion and publicity for the 
Senior Dance . . . possessor of dark brown hair and eyes . . . 
wouldn't give us his 'phone number. 





Page 7 



No record here of things they've done; 
We only seek to have some fun. 



SILVIO ADAMO 

We've observed that Silvio 
Is one who gets around; 
In his trusty Ford V8 
He can cover ground. 



CHARLOTTE ANDERSON 

She bustles through the corri 

dors 
At 8 A.M. each day- 
Collecting teachers' menus — 
So don't get in her way. 



ANGELINA ANDREWS 

In school she is most circum- 
spect — 
As though her claim to fame 
Depended on her being 
The first part of her name. 



HELEN ARNOLD 

Though some opine that she is 

shy, 
We find her nice to meet — 
And, if more details are desired, 
We'd say she's short and sweet. 



EDMUND AXPORD 

With spring in his legs 
And fire in his heart 
Our cross-country runner 
Gets set on his mark. 



RACHEL BAKER 

Nor is there 
Higher accolade — 
She is a dependable, 
Sensible maid. 



Page 8 




ALICE BAPTISTA 

Soon after eight each morning. 
As brightly as you please. 
She comes around to gather 
The lists of absentees. 



VINCENT BARATTA 

At basketball and football. 
Watching dancers glide — 
Everywhere that Vinny goes 
His camera's at his side. 



FRANCES BARLOW 

Her eyes are bright, her laugh- 
ter gay. 

And hers are dancing feet; 

Where'er she is, there's mis- 
chief, too — 

She's always fun to meet! 



EDWIN BASTONI 



Eddie's green car 
Has been thrown for a 
Uncle Samuel thinks 
He'd best get a "hoss." 



loss. 



JOAN BENSON 

If you would see her after one 
We fear she will not stay- 
She '11 jump into her Plymouth 
And be off White Horse way 



JOSEPH BERGAMINI 

Since Joseph was engaged to 

work 
In Grant's Department Store 
A plethora of peanut "ads" 
Adorns his locker door 



DORIS BERGONZINI 

That Doris is industrious 
No one could gainsay: 
Her lessons and her music 
Pill each minute of each day. 



RICHARD BOTIERI 

We seldom see him happy, 
We seldom see him gay — 
Yet he must find enjoyment 
In his own peculiar way. 



ROBERT BOTIERI 

He's witty in our classes, 
He's prankish on the street: — 
But on the football field he's 

grim 
In victory or defeat. 



DORIS BOUCHARD 

Doris cannot frown for long, 
No matter how she tries — 
For, though she wrinkles up her 

brow, 
There's laughter in her eyes. 



BERNARD BOUDROT 

No real need 
To struggle and sweat — 
He thinks he's found 
A better way yet. 



PHYLLIS BOUTIN 

Wavy hair and roguish eyes 
And pert, tip-tilted chin — 
But what we'll all remember 

best 
Is Phyl's infectious grin! 




ROSETTA BOYNTON 

If you are convinced 
Oral topics are fun, 
You cannot see why 
She loathes giving one. 



ELEANOR BRENNER 

Whether things go wrong or 

well, 
She's pleasant all the while; 
She has for everyone she meets 
A gay and charming smile. 



THOMAS BREWER 

Whene'er our band is on the 

march, 
Its music loud and clear — 
There is bass-drum Tommy 
Bringing up the rear. 



DAVID BRIGGS 

He wastes no precious moments 

In search of a panacea — 

He knows that man and boy 

alike 
Must labor without fear. 



MARCIA BROOKS 

We like your lustrous, wavy 

hair, 
We like your eyes, true blue — 
We sound like some romantic 

swain, 
But Marcia — we like you! 



GEORGE BRYANT 

His first love, his true love 
From him soon may part; 
Without four tires she cannot 

run, 
Sans battery, cannot start. 



Page 9 



RONALD BUTTERFIELD 

Like honest criticism? 
D'you take it if you can? 
For, if you like straightforward- 
ness, 
Ron' Butterfield's your man! 







LM+A 



GEORGE BUTTERS 

We know he can be bellicose 
If he feels he cannot yield, 
But for the most part he re- 
serves 
His fight for the football field. 



MARJORIE CAMPBELL 

On those days when book re- 
ports 
Are certain to be written, 
With some mysterious malady 
Our Marjorie is smitten. 



GEORGE CANUCCI 

If in the years that lie ahead 
We find we're in a jam, 
We'll call on him to help us 
In the courts of Uncle Sam. 



ROBERT CARLISLE 

He should own a rooster 
And learn to heed its call, 
Then getting where he should 

be 
Would be no task at all. 




# ^Ma 



HENRY CARVALHO 

In any group he's welcome: 
His genial spirit serves 
To calm conflicting spirits 
And quiet jangled nerves. 




EDWARD CAVICCHI 

When we think of Edward, 
There's no need words to 

bandy; 
Now we can be terse in verse — 
He's our Handy Andy. 



EDITH CHILDS 

There is a gleam of copper 
As a sunbeam passes by, 
As though with auburn tresses 
It could hope to vie. 



MURDOCK CHRISTIE 

He's surveyed the faculty 
And envies no man there 
Except Coach Walker — with his 

job 
No other can compare. 



SHIRLEY COLLINS 

We know making posters 
Can often be tedious, 
But her skill and patience 
Are truly egregious. 



ROBERT COOK 

If anyone should ask us what 
Profession he should choose, 
"Behind the footlights," we'd 

reply, 
"He'd fill that Welles man's 

shoes!" 



HERBERT COSTA 

Herbert has his formula 

For always keeping gay; 

He sits right down to toot his 

horn — 

He blows the blues away. 



Page 10 



HERBERT CROWELL 

In coat and tails 
And splendid derby 
Is not the way 
We picture Herbie. 



HAROLD DeCARLI 

To teach us English grammar 
Is what M. Raymond tries, 
But she gets sidetracked often 
By Harold's many "whys." 




ARTHUR DOTEN 

No day is there 
So gray or grim 
But our spirits rise 
When we talk with him. 



4t*i 



>*£M 



DONALD DOUGLAS 

You may think him 
Meek and shy, 
But there is mischief 
In his eye. 



MARGARET DIAZ 

Patience is a virtue 
Possessed, we know, by you, 
Though tasks may be laborious 
We find you smiling through. 



PHYLLIS DIEGOLI 

We liked her at first sight, 
We liked her at second — 
The extent of our liking's 
Not easily reckoned. 



RICHARD DiSTEFANO 

Deftly his fingers wander 
Over the ivory keys, 
On his patient practice 
We could write homilies. 



MARY CLAIRE DONOVAN 

She thinks he's simply wonder- 
ful! 

We shouldn't mention names, 

But in this case 'twill do no 
harm — 

He's Bugler Harry James! 




VIRGINIA DOUGLAS 

She refuses to be won 
By blandishment or guile, 
No quip of ours or antic 
Can evoke a smile. 



PATRICIA DOUGLASS 

The blare of martial music, 
The sound of marching feet — 
And with the Plymouth High 

School Band 
She's strutting down the street. 



AGNES EMOND 

Miss Emond, you amaze us! 
Now won't you tell us where 
And when and how ( we wish we 

knew!) 
You learned to do your hair? 



JAMES PILLEBROWN 

He has a boon companion 
Who has grown up with him; 
May he not soon be parted 
From his infectious grin. 



Page 11 



BARBARA PISH 

Given her way, 

To the skies she would soar; 

Her interest lies 

With the Army Air Corps. 



GEORGE FONTAINE 

Passing strange, we call it, 
Since math class he adored. 
That he cannot read the 35 
Upon his instrument board. 



SAMUEL FRANC, JR. 

He has a mind like Einstein, 
Each day we're thrilled anew; 
The imponderables he explains 
With, "Theoretically it's true." 



JENNETTE PRANKS 

We searched the dictionary: 
Mellifluous is our choice — ■ 
We feel it is the proper word 
To describe her voice. 



JOSEPH FRATUS 

Though he has a serious air, 
There's basis for the rumor 
That beneath his thoughtful- 

ness 
Joe has a sense of humor. 




*M*A 



RUEZ GALLERANI 

If the family car is in your 

hands 
When the fender gets a dent, 
Just drive posthaste to Ruez — 
You'll find your time well spent. 




DORIS GAMMONS 

She tackles a job 
Without fiddle or fuss — 
Could be an example 
For many of us. 



WILLIAM GAULT 

There's always fun when Bill's 

around 
As all of us have seen. 
Remember when in history class 
We launched the "B-19"? 



RICHARD GAVONE 

Dick, as a- -er- -ah— writer. 
You're--er--ah--very good; 
You soon may outdo Winchell — 
We really think you could! 



DOROTHY GELLAR 

In all the years we've known 

you, 
We have discovered this: 
Whene'er it comes to talking. 

you're 
A "hand"-y sort of miss! 



JAMES GHELLI 

"Least said, soonest mended" 
Has ever been his creed: 
Why waste breath in talking 
When there is no need? 



JUNE GILLIS 

If you are an example of 
What girls from Wareham do. 
Then we're certain that we'd 

like them 
As much as we like you. 



Page 12 



WILLIAM GILMAN 

How happy every girl would 

be— 
And this without exception — 
If the fates had given her 
His pink and white complexion ! 



PHYLLIS GINHOLD 

We think that no department 

store 
Could rival her display 
Of lovely costume jewelry — 
About it she's "that way." 



MARY GODDARD 

Contrary Mary, raise your voice 
Or we miss your recitation, 
Full well we know on hockey 

field 
You screech with wild elation. 



RICHARD GREEN 

If the Town Team needs a 

player, 
We can produce another; 
We know he has the thing it 

takes 
To pitch just like his brother. 



BURTON GREY 

"I'm only the man who grinds 

it!" 
He's driven to explain: 
"If your car runs out of gas, 
Don't give me the blame." 



DONALD GRISWOLD 

Leave gun at home and emulate 
The well-known wily fox — 
No beast nor bird could e'er re- 
sist 
The lure of orange socks. 




Akfctitifc 




FLORA GUIDETTI 

You're quiet, reserved, 
When we see you each day — 
But, Flora, we'd guess 
You're not always that way! 



HOWARD HAIRE 

He's smooth and suave, a gen- 
tleman, 
His manner is not partial: 
The girls in P. H. S. all say, 
"He's just like Herbert Mar- 
shall." 



GERTRUDE HARJU 

We can speak no ill of her 
Even if we would, 
She comports herself always 
As a lady should. 



STEWART HATCH 

Here's a brave hunter 
The girls all prefer! 
Whatever the game 
He's no amateur. 



ALBERT HATTON 

He doubts the very things he 

sees, 
All theories he flouts; 
Now even we are doubting 
That Albert really doubts. 



HAROLD HAYWARD 

And see that 



Hear that click? 

flash? 
Look out, you camera-shy! 
For someone's likely to 

"shot" 
When Hayward's passing by 



be 



Page 13 



JUSTINE HAYWARD 

When we're in the depths and 

filled with woe 
And in need of some cheering, 

we think 
Of Justine — she has what it 

takes : 
A radiant smile and a saucy 

wink. 



WINPIELD HENRY 

It's fine to know you're needed 

In some activity: 

Take basketball — we needed 

him 
Indubitably. 



MARGARET HOLMAN 

What's more fun 
Than taking a ride 
On the back of a horse 
Through the countryside? 



CATHERINE HOLMES 

She has no need of artifice, 
Of rouge or facial pack — 
She has on tap the kind of 

blush 
That most girls seem to lack. 



ELDORA HOLMES 

Eldora, please make noise, 
Eldora, don't be still — 
But though we plead forlornly, 
Eldora never will. 



GEORGE HOLMES 

Quiet, unassuming — 
Who would have ever guessed 
That his sense of humor 
Is among the best. 




JOAN HOLMES 

Her record points a lesson 
For all who will to learn: 
Each honor she's been given 
Is one she's worked to earn. 



MARCIA HOLMES 

From careful observation 
We feel qualified to say 
That from all the colors 

could choose 
Her favorite is grey. 



she 



PAULINE HOLMES 

Photogenically 
She rates high — 
Proofs from Purdy 
Do not lie. 



MURIEL HUMPHREY 

She will rhumba, she will conga, 
She will do the tango, too — 
She will teach you any dance 

step 
That is intricate — and new. 



BELLA JESSE 

Industrious as the busy bee 
But happy all the while; 
Rarely have we seen her 
Without a friendly smile. 



EUNICE JESSE 

If we had a sister to 

Work miracles at night, 

Our bedraggled locks would 

gleam 
In the morning light 



Page 14 



EDDIE JOHNSON 

In Plymouth or in Plympton 

Eddie never changes: 

He'll laugh life off, contented 

with 
Whatever Fate arranges. 



MARTHA KALLIO 

It's not that we believe we're 

omniscient, 
It's just that we've seen what is 

sufficient 
To make us think she doesn't 

intend 
Her life as a bachelor girl to 

spend. 



WILLIAM KELLER 

A sturdy nine is on the field 
Behind their Captain Keller, 
We could be harboring in our 

midst 
A most sensational Feller. 



JOHN KELLEY 

Come on, Gabriel, blow your 

horn, 
Sing, angels, far and near — 
No answer? Well, John Kelley 
And the jitterbugs are here. 



MARY KENNEDY 

Mary stands ready! 
No need to coax or wheedle — 
She does her bit in total war 
With her trusty knitting needle. 



GRACE LACEY 

Calm and collected 
All the day through, 
She keeps her composure 
Whatever we do. 




FLORINDA LEAL 

In sports or in the classroom 
In any kind of test 
Whenever people speak of her, 
She always rates the best. 



ARLEEN LINTON 

At work or play, in school or 

out, 
In earnest or in fun, 
She's proved herself to be 

"Grade-A" 
In everything she's done. 



HOWARD LIVINGSTONE 

To star on the gridiron 
He doesn't feel able, 
But he is invincible 
At the ping pong table. 



GERALD LONGHI 

If you ever have a headache 
Or you sniffle and ka-choo, 
Run quickly to "Balboni's" 
And he'll tell you what to do. 



JOHN LOPES 

He had the intestinal fortitude 
To stay with typing and short- 
hand — 
Not many senior boys we know 
Belong to that gallant band. 



VIRGINIA LYNCH 

Her lipstick is right, her hair 

softly waved — 
Her clothing is carefully 

pressed; 
Wherever she goes, whatever 

she does, 
She's always impeccably 

dressed. 



Page 15 



HAROLD MACCAPERRI 

He never pays attention 
To the girls — it is a shame! 
The only passes he will make 
Are in a football game. 



BARBARA MALOON 

We've taxed her time and pa- 
tience, 
But she's borne it very well— 
What a saga of endurance 
Her typewriter could tell. 



MARIE MARTINELLI 

To varied tasks 
Her art is lent: 
She's proved herself 
Most competent. 



EVELYN MAYNARD 

Be the weather fair or foul 
She is on her way, 
As faithful as the postman 
She makes her rounds each day. 



FAITH MILLMAN 

A song on her lips 
And joy in her heart, 
We've noticed she always 
Does more than her part. 



FREDERICK MITCHELL 

Freddie made a speech one day. 
And he didn't say, "Oh, 

shucks!" 
He told us very plainly: 
He wants to wear a "tux"! 




LYDIA MONGAN 

Her sketches can send thrills 
Of pleasure up our spines: 
Lydia is a specialist 
In curves and lovely lines. 



ETHELWYN MORRIS 

Quiet and capable 
As we can tell, 
Ethelwyn's sure to do 
Everything well. 



ARLENE MORSE 

"Where there's a will. 
There's a way," we've learned. 
And this advice 
She has not spurned. 



ARTHUR MOSKOS 

When he's within the classroom. 
He appears to be quite tame; 
But out upon the football field 
He puts wild cats to shame. 



MARY MULCAHY 

Victory for the seniors 
Makes Mary's visage beam. 
Not difficult to understand— 
She's captain of the team. 



CONNIE MURRAY 

"Hey, Connie, how'd you do this 

one?" 
"Was it page fifty-three?" 
We know she'll have the facts 

we need, 
So capable is she. 



Page 16 



MARJORIE NEAL 

Since music often is defined 
As the medicine of the mind, 
Her mental health might well 

surpass 
That of any in her class. 



JOHN NUTTERVILLE 

Miss Kelly is wondering 
Just what she'll do: 
Can she find a banker 
As faithful as you? 




I kH 1 






BEATRICE O'CONNELL 

She's happy all the day 
Out of school or in, 
But when she's playing basket- 
ball, 
The smile becomes a grin. 



RICHARD PARKS 

If a boy is purposeful, 
He belongs in school — 
Except in ducking season, 
Is his version of the rule. 



RICHARD PAVESI 

On a bicycle built for one 
He pedals undismayed; 
With his determination 
He's sure to make the grade. 



ARTHUR PEDERZANI 

If we had plenty of energy, 
Vim and vigor to spare, 
We might catch up with Ar- 
thur — 
But the prospect is not fair. 




GIO PEDERZANI 

Gio is a chef of sorts — 
Two products he combines 
To delight all comers: 
He deals in "hot canines.' 



RUTH PEDERZANI 

With ankle socks and saddle 

shoes 
A sweater girl is she 
Who listens to directions 
And labors cheerfully. 



BENJAMIN PERRY 

If you want a portrait 
Or just a keep-off sign, 
Just put a paint brush in 

hand 
And he will serve you fine. 



his 



NAOMI PERRY 

No matter where you see her 
Or what she's working at, 
She always has a giggle 
And always time to chat. 



CHARLES PETERSON 

His colorful attire 
Has served one purpose well: 
The drabness of a Monday 
It can certainly dispel. 



JEAN PETIT 

As recess time approaches, 
Her hopes are running high; 
'Tis not the thought of food 

alone 
That brings the sparkle to her 

eye. 



Page 17 



GEORGE PICARD 

In moments of real danger 
You would your wits assemble, 
Yet a little thing, reciting, 
Causes you to tremble. 



ISABELLE PIERSON 

When I. P. moved to Boston, 
Everything looked black — 
Now P. H. S. is happy: 
Our Isabelle's moved back! 



J. ERNEST PIERSON 

The Mighty Mite 
Of Forty-two — 
To you alone 
This honor's due. 



ALBERT PILLSBURY 

He's superb in mathematics 
When he gives a proposition; 
Such accomplishments, we hint. 
Result from intuition. 



CATHERINE PIMENTAL 

No brickbats for her 
Nor bunches of flowers — 
But we're glad she was with us 
Throughout schoolday hours. 



MANUEL PIMENTAL 

If he's as good stock boy 
As collector of dimes, 
The day will soon come 
When he'll see better times. 




HENRY PINA 

Beautiful figures 
May always be found 
Whenever his pencil 
And he are around. 



ALBERT POST 

Atlas now 
May take his bow, 
For Al is here 
To show him how. 



HELEN RANDALL 

Helen dearly loves to dance 
And she embraces every chance; 
If that is how she keeps so 

slim. 
Here's a way to keep in trim. 



ROBERT RAYMOND 

Baseball has not 
Lost its savor — 
In his choice of sport 
He does not waver 



LAURA RESNICK 

Nicki went to Penn last year. 
And boy, did she have fun! 
Then home she came to tell us 
Of all she'd seen and done. 



DORIS ROGAN 

If lack of a smile 
Can spell defeat. 
No untoward end 
Will Doris meet. 



Page 18 



GERALD ROMANO 

Jerry finds the spot he wants 
In the middle of the floor; 
In goes the basketball — 
Up goes our score. 



DENA ROSSI 

A ticket to the cinema 
Is forty cents, we know — 
Dena's smile alone's worth more 
Than admission to the show. 



JOHN RUSSELL 

Ducks are Johnny's true love, 
Everyone please note — 
Autumn brings him hunting, 
Summer brings his boat. 



EVELYN RYERSON 

If she makes a date to skate, 
She'll be there on the dot: 
We suspect she plans some day 
To put Henie on the spot. 



ELAINE SADOW 

Who's that tearing down the 

street? 
Is she off to catch a train? 
If it's almost eight o'clock, 
You can bet that it's Elaine. 



ELSIE SALMI 

Dale Carnegie has frequently 
declared: 

"A name correctly used may 
win a friend"; 

Yet, though she's called "Sala- 
mi," she won't care — 

She seems possessed of pa- 
tience without end. 




JULIA SCHNEIDER 

Whosoever marries her 
A lucky man will be, 
For she excels in sewing 
As well as cookery. 



LOIS SCHNEIDER 

Whene'er we see Lois 
She's walking with Grace, 
A light in her eye 
And a smile on her face. 



ANNA SCOTTI 

Well developed, we should say, 
Her powers of observation — 
Her skill in handling detail 

tests 
Created a sensation. 



HELEN SHAW 

If you've noticed lately 
That she's acquired a frown, 
It's because these verses 
Almost got her down. 



JUNE SHAW 

Perky, multi-colored bows 
Adorn milady's hair; 
No need has she of artifice 
To make her seem more fair. 



SIDNEY SHWOM 

In history class 
He is a whiz, 
He can't be thrown 
By any quiz. 



Page 19 



MANUEL SILVA 

For hours of keen enjoyment 
When you are alone, 
He recommends the purchase 
Of a good trombone. 



STELLA SIMMONS 

"What you need, go out and 

earn," 
Our teachers oft exhort; 
But in her case it's difficult — 
Stella's very short. 



TONY SIRRICO 

We resolve and resolve again 
Most circumspect to be, 
But an argument with Tony 
Ends pyrotechnically. 



BARBARA SKINNER 

Her many sterling qualities 
All frailties outweigh, 
Perfection is her only goal; 
She works toward it each day. 



ELSPETH SLOAN 

She has made a benedict 
Of a very special man 
Before he leaves to do a job 
For his Uncle Sam. 



PATRICIA SMITH 

If your fingers move as nimbly 

as your tongue 
From twelve-fifteen until the 

stroke of one, 
And your pencil's sharpness 

parallels your wit's, 
You'll be an artist, Pat, before 

you're done. 




TONY SOARES 

While Tony has his music, 

He'll never be alone! 

The sweetest sounds come out 

each time 
He plays his slide trombone. 



CHARLES STASINOS 

As orator 

He lacks the ease 

Of the great 

Demosthenes. 



JEANNETTE STRASSEL 

The thought of summer study 
Might be less alluring 
Were there no compensations 
To make it worth enduring. 



MORTON STURTEVANT 

If the National Geographic 
Were the textbook in a class, 
No one of us need ever try 
His knowledge to surpass. 



DANIEL SULLIVAN 

Every class has its pugilist. 
And here's another one: 
Not too surprising when 

know 
His last name's Sullivan. 



you 



LUZETTA SWIFT 

Some find her sad and serious. 
Some say she's gay, amusing — 
A dual personality? 
It's really most confusing. 



Page 20 



JOSEPH SYLVIA 

The gridiron statistics 
Of our heroes bold 
Joseph is one boy 
Who needn't be told. 







CHARLOTTE VALLER 

Since we have witnessed 
Her gay energy, 
We have decided: 
A tomboy is she. 



MARY TADDIA 

Both mental and physical ex- 
ercise 

She'd have within her day — 

She may not know it, but the 
Greeks 

Thought this the ideal way. 





BETTY VIETS 

With fingers capable 

And slim 

She's any knitter's 

Paradigm. 



DOLORES TARANTINO 

There's a winsome smile for 

everyone 
When Dolores passes by, 
Perhaps she likes us just as well 
As dear old Kingston High! 



RUTH TAVARES 

She has no love for Wednesday, 
For that is her gym day — 
Yet those who know have 

pointed out 
That all should learn to play. 





(u* 





JEAN TORRANCE 

Beneath her breath 
She hums a tune; 
Ccmmencement Days 
Will be here soon. 





MARJORIE TOUPIN 

No matter what the group is 
With which she deigns to 

mingle, 
Before she's there for very long. 
With merriment 'twill tingle. 





PEARL VITTI 

What is so fair 
As a lovely girl? 
What is so rare 
As one like Pearl? 



VIOLA WAGER 

A pleasing personality 
She never fails to show: 
We declare with unanimity 
She's very nice to know. 



ARLINE WHITE 

She remains quite adamant, 
No hat her head shall grace: 
What's better than a kerchief 
To frame a lady's face? 



TERESA WHITE 

She seems most shy and quiet 
When through the hall she 

walks; 
But, when she reaches study 

class, 
She talks and talks and talks. 



Page 21 



ROGER WHITING 

Rog rates tops among us; 
His time has been well-spent — 
He's shown us his ability 
As our class president. 



ROBERT WILSON 

Bob was made for leadership — 
At least, 'twould be our guess: 
He's proved an able president 
Of our school S. A. S.! 



RICHARD WIRTZBURGER 
Too much we've heard of 

With the Light Brown Hair", 
To say as much to Dickie 
We would never dare. 



DOROTHEA WOOD 

In class or in the corridor 
She seldom says a word: 
But in another way, we think, 
She'll make herself be heard. 




NATALIE WOOD 

Whenever Nat giggles, 
She wrinkles her nose; 
We like her good nature — 
It's never a pose. 



PAULINE WOOD 

Since tires have been rationed, 
She's laid a new course: 
She'll travel in triumph 
Astride a fine horse. 



EVAN YATES 

Two sounds, above all others, 

His interest will win: 

The rhythmic beat of flying 

feet. 
The voice of the violin. 



JOHN YOUNGMAN 

Life is so busy 
It's never a bore: 

After schoolday tasks 
He looks for more. 



CLAIRE ZIEGENGEIST 

Quiet is her manner 
Throughout the livelong day, 
Incredible to us the thought 
That she's any other way. 



Page 22 



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Pagre 24 



L^iass Will 



WE, the Class of 1942, as our days in Plymouth High School come to 
a close, will carry in our hearts as dear memories the oft-repeated 
phrases of our teachers. As a token of our gratitude for the influence 
and benefit which we have received from them, and because from lips other 
than theirs these words would lose their significance, we deem it fitting 
that in this declaration of our last will and testament, we bequeath certain 
phrases back to their teacher owners, so that they may continue to influence 
students for years to come. 

Miss Iris E. Albertini Oh, for a poem! 

Mr. Charles I. Bagnall Take a rest. 

Miss Viola M. Boucher There's a great deal that has to be done! 

Miss Elinor Brown Well, now! 

Mrs. Margaret E. Brown Let me see your work! 

Mr. Vincent De Benedictis Well, let's try it over again! 

Mrs. Beatrice E. Garvin Oh, come on girls, jump! ! ! 

Mr. Carlo T. Guidaboni Stick around! 

Miss Beatrice A. Hunt Posture! Use your diaphragm! 

Miss Jeannette C. Jacques Oh, you're not keen! C'est facile! 

Miss Helen C. Johnson Now, class, we will start a NEW budget! 

Miss Lydia E. Judd And what comes next, class? 

Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly What poor bookkeepers you children make! 

Miss Katherine J. Lang Well, it's your job to know! 

Miss Nellie R. Locklin Where is my answer book? 

Mr. Edgar J. Mongan, Principal And another thing — 

Miss Dorris Moore Don't be late for rehearsals! 

Mr. John W. Packard Waell, anyhoo! — Aeronca 

Mr. Arthur G. Pyle Do I have to get tough about it? 

Miss Amy M. Rafter Are there further questions or comments? 

Mrs. Miriam A. Raymond That's trite! 

Mr. Mario J. Romano See me at 1 :05! 

Mr. Richard Smiley Ye gods and little fishes! 

Mr. John H. Walker Altogether now! Let's go! 

Miss Margie E. Wilber I have a horse. A horse is to me. 

Page 25 



CLR5S HISTORY OnRDG CRSY 



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FOR six years the National Society of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution has asked each graduating class to name its Best Girl 
Citizen. The girl awarded this honor must possess to an outstanding 
degree the qualities of dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism. 
In the Class of 1942, Plymouth High School, that girl is Faith Millman. 

As a sophomore, Faith was Assistant School News Editor on The Pil- 
grim, participated with enthusiasm in sports, and was chairman of the Invi- 
tation Committee for the Sophomore Hop. In her junior year, she served on 
the Matron Committee for the Junior Promenade, took the leading feminine 
role in the operetta "Martha," became a member of the National Honor 
Society, and sang first soprano in the Girls' Sextet. Now, as a senior, 
Faith has been captain of the second hockey team, a member of the 
Invitation Committee for the Senior Dance, and Senior Features Editor on 
The Pilgrim. She was a member of the Gay 90's Revue, sang on the radio 
with the sextet, and was a member of the Dramatic Club. During her 
entire high school career, her name has appeared on the Honor Roll for 
highest honors, and, naturally enough, she became a member of the Senior 
Honor Group. 

Faith is a junior member of the Plymouth Woman's Club, and does Red 
Cross work. 

The Class of 1942 awarded the title of Best Girl Citizen to one who 
richly deserved it. 

Doris Bergonzini '42 



Page 26 



S^evtioM on j^arade 



FAITH, a quiet young senior, wasn't quite sure whether to be angry or 
embarrassed when the camera broke during her appointment with the 
photographer . . . Sammy has finally discovered that his teacher in 
trigonometry is a great deal more brilliant than he is ... If you ever ride 
with Eddie Johnson, look out the side window. The picket fence is an 
optical illusion. If you doubt our word, ask Eddie to slow down, and you 
will discover that the fence is composed of telephone poles . . . Don't be so 
downhearted, Roger, when we are critical of class meeting procedures. You 
may well take notice of the fact that very few pupils have initiative enough 
to "rise to a point of order." Possibly the majority of the seniors are not 
entirely sure of their parliamentary law . . . We are justly proud of two 
members of our class who are no longer with us. They are Robert Post 
and Joseph Coggeshall of the United States Navy ... If girls care about 
such things, and we have been told that they do, we suggest the Shaw-Vitti 
method. We hereby nominate the Misses Shaw and Vitti as the two most 
coy in the class of 1942 . . . Our seniors did a commendable job in the ora- 
torical contest, but the younger generation just can't be beaten . . . William 
Gault and William Keller were victims of some sort of chronic malady last 
winter that required them to remain at home on many important exam- 
ination days . . . "Believe it or not" — Statistics prove that John Kelley has 
been a much better boy this past year. Of course, it is only fair to inform 
the student body that his throwing arm went back on him the first week 
of school . . . Since we have Queens of This and Queens of That, let's elect 
Janie Franks "Queen of Enunciation and Pronunciation" . . . We sincerely 
believe that George Canucci is studious, but we are not gullible enough 
to think that he has been discussing homelessons with Arleen all year long 
... At first we thought Lydia was well-mannered because of circumstances 
beyond her control, but now we have come to the conclusion that she is 
pleasant by nature ... If the Class of '42 ever became' stranded on an 
island, it could still expect to eat, because Russell, Griswold, Carlisle, and 
Fillebrown all have excellent reputations as hunters . . . Boys, is Agnes 
Emond correct in believing that clothes make the girl? . . . Teddy has been 
a French student for quite some time, but the phrase that he translates 
with greatest ease is "cherchez la femme" ... If you believe that the only 
causes worth fighting for are the lost ones, try to persuade Morton Sturte- 
vant to speak more slowly . . . We, the Seniors, have been told by Mr. 
Mongan that we have maintained an exceptionally high scholastic average 
. . . May all our future endeavors be worthy of such high praise. 

Richard Gavone '42 

Page 27 



\Ju,r ^Jask 



Some years ago, vague fears assailed 
Our country: fears of strife 
That lightly touched America, 
But held no threat to life. 



Today we hear the drone of planes. 
And still the trucks roll by; 
We know full well that there's a task: 
The patriot's flame burns high! 



Noiv, war is a reality, 

Though vague and dimly felt 

Except by those who have known pain 

When death its bloiv has dealt. 



No longer need our wondering youth 
Feel words are poorly spent 
That tell us we must blaze the trail 
To some new firmament. 



In truth, we have a mighty task 
To keep our nation free; 
The torch is ours — we must not fail; 
We fight for liberty! 



Elizabeth Viets '42 



G V> 




HONOR GROUP 

Front Row: George Canucci, Helen Shaw. Lydia Mongan, Mrs. Raymond, Faith Mill- 
man, Jennette Franks, Harold DeCarli 

Second Row: Barbara Skinner, Florinda Leal, Anna Scotti, Mary Kennedy. Connie 
Murray, Laura Resnick, Isabelle Pierson 

Third Row: Robert Wilson, Roger Whiting, Richard Gavone, Richard Wirtzburger. 
Robert Cook, David Briggs, Samuel Franc 



Page 28 




LITERATURE 



R.Post 



CONTENTMENT 

Few are the hearts where true content 

Does in its fullness dwell, 

And few are those who rightly prise 

Its calm and holy spell. 

He who true contentment feels. 

However low his lot, 

Holds in his hand a jewel rare 

That will forsake him not. 

Elsie Salmi '42 



SEASCAPE 

Laces of foam on dazzling shores 
Encrust the hem of the ocean strand; 
Gleaming, glistening, shining and white, 
Capriciously tossed by the ocean's hand. 
Star -spattered skies shine darkly on 

high; 
Limpid, the ocean lies sleeping below, 
Sighing in slumber, tossing a bit 
While the breeze croons a Barcarolle 

soft and low. 

Lydia Mongan '42 



DIANA IN DECEMBER 

The moon 

In shimmering, silvery silence 

Shakes streams of scintillating snow- 
stars 

From out her sable cloak 

Upon a sleeping countryside. 

Then, sweeping up her silken skirts. 

She silently departs; 

And as she steals away to meet the sun- 
rise, 

She looks back, sees that all is peace, 

And smiles. 

Jennette Franks '42 



NOCTURNAL VISITANT 

I see the fog roll in at night 

And hide the winking stars from 
view. 
It steals and creeps on muffled feet 
And veils our town in dismal hue. 
Along the roads the street lights bright 
Are now choked by this clutching 
dew. 

When morning comes, the fog takes 
leave 
And drifts on to some other place: 
Our town stands out in sunshine blessed. 
The roads, wet from the fog's em- 
brace, 
Give ample proof for all to know — 

A London night has passed in space. 

George Canucci '42 



TRAVELLING MAN 

Christopher Clifford is packing his bag, 

Christopher's going home — 
He's travelling light with a change for 
the night, 
But he won't need a toothbrush or 
comb. 

Christopher's taking a bottle or two, 
For Christopher's fond of his 
drink — 

A couple of flasks of the finest brew, 
But it isn't the kind you'd think! 

For Christopher Clifford is ten days old, 
Arid he's leaving the hospital soon; 

Snug in a beautiful blanket rolled, 
He bids farewell with a tune. 

Mary Mulcahy '42 



Page 29 




;/ 



Jk 



ouse 



cJLast and ^rlrit 

Beside the back piazza 

And bordering the lawn, 
There stands a stately ash tree 

That I love to look upon. 

In spring, when all the neighbors' trees 
Have sprouted sprigs of green, 

Our temperamental ash tree 
Is still leafless, stark, and clean. 

But ere the heat of summertime 

Requires protecting shade, 
Our guard against the sun is then 

In verdant garb arrayed. 

When other trees in autumn 

With matchless hues abound, 
Our ash tree stands denuded, 

Its leaves upon the ground. 

And these, obedient to her call, 

As winds blow high and low 
To Nature's most eccentric child, 

Are last to come, and first to go. 

Faith Millman '42 



My house is on a grassy knoll 
And overlooks the sea; 
It battles all the winter storms, 
But safely harbors me. 

My house is low arid rambling 
With cozy little rooms, 
Where in the winter evenings 
No fear of world strife looms. 

My house has two large sen- 
tinels 

Which guard my sleep at night; 

The wind soughs through their 
branches 

And soothes my dreams till 
light, 

My house is more than shelter. 
It grows in strength each year: 
It has a personality 
That will not disappear. 

Betty Viets '42 




_-*--■• 



oLullab 



'/ 




The sun is set; and darkiiess 

creeps 
So softly o'er a weary country- 
side. 
Dark clouds hang low; the 

pale moon peeps 
Between the clouds, then slips 
away to hide. 
Soft snowflakes fall; all nature 

sleeps 
Beneath a glistening blanket, 
far and wide. 
So rest, my sweet; in slum- 
ber's deeps 
I leave you now. Sleep well 
till morningtide! 

Jennette Franks '42 



Page 30 



SUNRISE 

AS the blackness before dawn melted to a reddish grey, a group of 
men on a half-built bridge waited breathlessly for the first sight of 
the sun. "Hanged at sunrise" were the words which were running 
through the minds of all. With a circle of death draped loosely around his 
neck, a short, blond Confederate soldier glanced nervously toward a younger 
Yankee lieutenant. The sun was rising; in a moment there would be one 
less Confederate soldier in this troubled world. 

Bowling Stuart had lived all his life in Virginia. At the age of twenty- 
five he had married a fair young Southern belle and had taken title to his 
father's plantation. With two children, he had lived happily for six 
years and now, when he was the happiest, the Yankees were separating 
him from all that he held dear. Enrolled as a colonel in the Confederate 
army, he had been captured just twenty miles from Southern territory. He 
had been sentenced to be hanged as a spy at sunrise on this morning of 
October 31, 1863. 

When the lieutenant signaled, Bowling felt the support beneath give 
way. Down, down he went, the rope tightened, hisl neck snapped — was 
this water? Gasping for air while shots whizzed by from the bridge above, 
he ducked his head and drifted with the swirling current. 

A mile down the river, he staggered upon the bank. Shivering from his 
wet clothes and the cold of the morning, he set out on a run to keep warm. 
"Only twenty miles to safety," he thought. "Ah! they won't catch me this 
time. It's a good thing I kept my eyes open while I was a captive." 

As the sun climbed high overhead, he left the river to avoid a North- 
ern encampment. 

"How ironical! A week ago I was a condemned man in that very 
place. It would be fine indeed if I can get food there and steal a horse and 
uniform without being caught. Let me see; how can I do it? My matches 
are dry. I'll set the woods on fire and draw all the men from camp." 

Quickly he lighted the surrounding underbrush and darted as fast as 
possible to a thicket outside the mess hall. 

"There's the alarm. It won't be long now — there goes the chef." 

He slipped silently in among the steaming kettles and ate hurriedly. 
Having found a worn uniform and a good horse, he left camp without 
much difficulty. By morning he would be sleeping in his own bed. He 
would see his children and hold his wife in his arms again. 

Dawn streaked the sky as he rode past the fields which had once been 
filled with singing darkies. Then Lincoln had given to the nation the 
Emancipation Proclamation. The soft southern morning lightened his 
heart as he lifted the knocker on the front door. Steps were approaching. 

"Bowling, it's you; you're home, darling!" sobbed his wife. 

How tightly her warm arms held his neck — she was choking him! 
Everything went black; Colonel Bowling Stuart was dead. 

"Right shoulder arms. Forward — march!" 

The squad disappeared over the brow of a hill while the body of Colonel 
Stuart swung silently in the morning mist. 

Malcolm Chamberlain '43 

Page 31 




nut 



tati 



ion 



MANHATTAN NIGHTFALL 

With blood-red glow 

I'd always seen the sun si?ik low 

Behind the vine tree and the fir — 

But once I saw her splash her fires 

On every pane 

In soaring, man-made towers; 

Each tiny square 

A blazing flash of light 

Which all too soon flared out and died 

As daylight melted into night. 

Isabel Brown '44 



HE 

I love this debonair young lad 

With straight, black hair and winning smile. 

Eyes with power to beguile; 

Dangling hands and awkward feet, 

Tall and slim, but always neat; 

A hand held out in friendliness, 

A smile ivhich speaks of manliness — 

/ love this debonair young lad. 

The brother that I never had! 

Joan Eldridge '44 



RHYTHMIC REFLECTIONS 

Each gleaming flame 

Is a graceful sylph 
Dancing a ballet 

On charred logs of white pine. 
The wind breathes — 

Each leaping flame flickers; 
The logs break — 

Each shivering flame quivers, 
Then gently fades away! 

Walter Roberts '44 



THE SEAMAN 

The Seaman is a wrinkled man — 
A man who's scarred and aged; 
His face is like the sea itself, 
A sea that is enraged. 

The Seaman is a ivithered man — 
A yuan who's old and gray; 
His sunken eyes are haunting eyes 
Which dream the livelong day. 

The Seaman is a ynystic man— 

A man from story books; 

Though he's sailed the seas and seen the 

world, 
He always seaward looks. 

Milton Glassman '44 



MASTERPIECE 

Last night, with frost crystals, 

Mother Nature painted 

A woodland scene upon my window pane. 

Feathery ferns — 
Fairest flowers — 
Etched on a backgroioid of majestic trees. 

Morning brought the sun — 
Setting the forest 
Ablaze with frozen fire. 

Robert Van Amburgh '44 



Page 32 



/, 



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& 



eatAst 



f 



WINTER WITCH 



When all the world was very still 
And it was hardly light, 
I woke and glanced outside my pane 
And found a world of wondrous white. 

A strange, enchanting sorceress 
Had walked through nook and dell, 
And with her cold and subtle kiss 
Had cast a magic spell. 

My tinkling brook was quiet now, 
Its face was glassy blue — 
And .where my daisies used to grow 
I found a drift of frozen dew. 

Lois Gunther '44 



TRANSITION 

The last star 

Has winked out of the steel-grey sky — 
And in the east, 

A faint flush plays above the silver-plated 
sea. 

Suddenly the grey is ablaze 
With the dazzling rays 
Of the orange arc 
Which slowly ascends 
Into the vault of heaven 
Until it sails, a ball of gold, 
In the azure sky of early morn. 

Robert Van Amburgh '44 



CHALLENGE 

The sea 

Lies green and shimmering — 

A scintillating emerald 

Challenging all who gaze at it 

To find fault 

With its flawless beauty. 

Prances Scheid '44 



A TOAST 

In moorland meadows by the sea, 
From rows of hay new-mown — 
With every summer breeze to me 
Delicious draughts are blown. 

I breathe the fragrance of the rose, 
The dainty lady's flower — 
/ taste the honey gift that goes 
To make each clover's dower. 

But most I like the fragrance fine 
Pressed from long, sweet grass, 
And poured like a transparent wine 
Into the day's clear glass. 

Beverly Feinberg '44 



WINTER'S JEWELS 

Winter's first white jewels hang heavy on 

the trees, 
And crystal tears lie frozen, secured there 

by the breeze, 
While bushes, like a dainty froth of filmy 

threadlike lace, 
Caress the lake, so still it lies, a mirror is 

its face. 

The sun plays twinkling melodies upon each 

new-dressed slope, 
And with each note there comes a dream 

of radiant, new-born hope; 
So white the world and pure, in innocence 

it lies, 
Wrapped in silent, blissful sleep under 

wintry skies. 

Ruth Dale '44 



Page 33 



GARETH AND LYNETTE 

Wm. Lam's Version 

IT all happened one day after a graduate from the romper stage, named 
Gareth, pushed his kiddy car up to his mater's rocker and ran off at the 
mouth about the condition of the world. He said he was going to be one of 
King Arthur's torpedoes, and rub out the guys who were trying to muscle 
in on his territory. His maw, Bellicent, handed him a sob story because 
she was afraid he would get his anatomy spread over the landscape. Finally 
she let him go provided he would agree to undress potatoes in King 
Arthur's hash house for a year and a day. 

Gareth played nursemaid to the onion bin for a while, but soon tired 
of crying over scallions. He was having trouble with the union anyway, 
so he went to King Arthur and told him that his real moniker was Gareth, 
and made the King promise that he should be allowed to assist the next 
damsel in distress. 

One day a dame by the name of Lynette threw out her anchor at King 
Arthur's wickiup. With tears and mascara running down her cheeks, she 
demanded Sir Lancelot, the strong, silent, glamor boy who made all the 
girls' tickers function on a War Time basis, to free her sister from the 
Castle Perilous where she was held by four fugitives from a Tong War. 
King Arthur, however, remembered his promise to Gareth, and instead of 
Sir Lancelot, he nominated Gareth. 

Lynette implied that King Arthur was an old fuddy duddy and tore 
out with a snit on. Gareth straddled his hay burner, released the brake, 
and galloped after Lynette! Who wouldn't? 

After futzing around for a while, they met up with Morning Star. 
Gareth and Morning Star started throwing the bull over whose old man 
was who, so Gareth gave him a backhander and sent him on his way to 
King Arthur. 

Lynette said he still smelled like Joe's Beanery and Gareth told her 
to stop slipping her clutch and get out of first speed. By this time they 
had sighted the next knight, Noonday Sun, who was really a flashy kid, 
but he lost his marbles when his horse slipped in the stream. Next Gareth 
encountered Evening Star, who had three or four layers of epidermis for 
armor plating. Evening star got a toe hold on him, and that made Gareth 
see red, so he blitzed him and threw him into the drink. About this time 
Lynette decided Gareth wasn't so gestanko and was ready to settle down 
to a quiet game of squiggin, but there was work to be done. 

As Gareth went to battle Death, the last knight, his feet were cold 
enough to freeze the Madison Square Garden skating rink. When his 
knees stopped beating a Conga long enough to enable him to deliver a 
roundhouse right to Death's button, Gareth was amazed to see Death fold 
up like a wet dish rag, and upon looking under the tin hat, he found that 
Death was just a little shrimp stooging for the other three guys. 

At this point authorities differ. Some say Gareth got spliced to 
Lynette, while others insist that Lady Lyonors, Lynette's sister, was the 
one who took the vow, but if Lynette let Gareth get away after he risked 
his life for her and took all those insults without yelling "Uncle," she 
couldn't have had much more on the ball than her finger prints. 

Page 34 



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THEY ALSO SERVE 



You, working there beside that drill, 
Why so glum? Does your heart not thrill 
To thoughts that with each passing day 
It's men like you who pave the way 
To victory o'er savage hordes? 

What's that you say? You'd rather serve 
With fighting men, and show your nerve 
To those who jibe and taunt and say 
That you're not brave, you've run away 
To hide behind your valued job? 

Stand by your task! Be not dismayed. 
Though there's no glory in your trade, 
The true worth lies withi?i your heart, 
Because you know you've done your part 
To rid the world of tyrant's reign. 

And tell this to those taunting fools: 
"They also serve ivho give us tools." 

Richard Kearsley '43 



MORTALITY 
'And that, too, shall pass away" (Genesis) 

Some day you'll turn to dust — 
Back to whence you came, 

To cover mortal cities 

And bury dying fame. 

Some day the winds will rage 
Across the wasted strands, 

And mortal eyes shall see no more 
Those worlds beneath the sands. 

Some day the moon will shine 

Upon a cold, bleak stone, 
And trace beneath a golden beam 

A name that is your own. 

Walter Silva '43 



ADOLESCENCE 

The happiest years of life, 'tis said, 

Are those of teen-age youth, 

But looking back on the life I've led, 

I can relate, forsooth, 

That Adolescence is watery cokes, 

And yearning for portable "vies" ; 

Just harmless gossip, fads galore 

And school girls' hockey sticks; 

It's a busy world, a dizzy world, this 

Hazy, lazy adolescent world, 

A disillusioning, exhausting time of strife, 

And a glamorous, amorous time of life. 

Phyllis Lawday '43 



LAUGHTER 

I hear it ringing from the children's room 
When morning rays of sun are beaming 

bright, 
Arid when the fears of darkness start to 

loom, 
I hear it echo far into the night. 
Its joyful sound escapes from happy 

crowds; 
Its merry tinkling soothes the sick and 

weak : 
And, even when the sky is black with 

clouds, 
I hear it pierce the storm most dark and 

bleak. 
From shelters crowded with both young 

and old, 
From ships that brave the dangers of the 

sea, 
From shacks that fail to block the storm 

and cold, 
I hear it shout at danger mockingly. 
For laughter makes the hearts of men grow 

light: 
Let's thank the Lord for laughter, day and 

night. 

Jean Boutin '43 



THE MESSENGER 

A tiny breeze this evening 
Gently glided by; 
It sped across the chimney tops 
And through a winter sky. 
It whirled the falling snowflakes 
Into mounds of crystal white: 
It kissed the land as it blew on, 
And breathed a soft good night. 

A tiny breeze in Europe 

Sorrowfully blew by; 

It heard the cannon roaring 

And it heard the battle cry. 

It hurried over rivers 

And over lakes grown red; 

It soothed the brows of soldiers, 

And it gently kissed the dead. 

In deep and tragic anguish 
It rose above the din, 
And wended its way toward Heaven 
Whispering , "This is sin!" 
God, heed this supplication: 
All hearts are turned to Thee; 
May hate and lust forever die, 
And leave our country free! 

Mary Capozucca '43 



Page 35 




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CONSOLATION 

HE 8:30 bell has rung, Cicero. Stop that shouting and sit down . . . 
What's the matter with you, Brutus? Are you jealous of Caesar? 
I'm sorry, Virgil, I'll have to reject this poetry . . . ,No oral topic 
prepared, Cicero? Take a zero and see me after class . . . You say that an 
apple fell on your head, Newton, and now you have a headache? . . . Galileo, 
stop staring through that telescope! . . . Shakespeare, you are positively 
stupid! The composition you handed in is a perfect example of childish 
exaggeration . . . Bacon, you had better change your style of writing. As 
an essayist you'll never make the grade. . . . Give me that paper, Wright! 
Pictures of airships! Humph! What's wrong with you? . . . Einstein, you 
failed miserably in that last physics quiz . . . Washington, I can't under- 
stand you. You'll never amount to anything." 

Who knows what statesman, what famous poet, what great mathe- 
matician, or what mad inventor may be trembling today within the walls 
of P.H.S.? 

Gladys Cohen '43 





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PILGRIM STAFF 

Front Row: William Lamborghini, Benjamin Brewster, Robert MacDonagh. George 

Radcliffe, William MacDonald, Loring Belcher, David Briggs 
Second Row: Ruth Morton, Richard Kearsley, Jennette Franks, George Canucci, 

Gladys Cohen, Mary Anderson, Marcia Brooks 
Third Row: Naomi McNeil, Jean Boutin, Marie Martinelli, Anna Scotti, Florinda Leal. 

Mrs. Raymond, Muriel Humphrey, Laura Resnick, Faith Millman, Betty Viets, 

Joan Eldridge 
Fourth Row: Isabelle Pierson, Helen Shaw, Edward Cavicchi, Barbara Maloon. Mar- 

jorie Neal, Lydia Mongan, Harold Hayward, Isabel Brown, Virginia Lynch. Joan 

Holmes 
Fifth Row: Roger Whiting, Edwin Bastoni, Richard Wirtzburger, Ronald BUtterfield, 

Bernard Kritzmacher, Richard Gavone 
Absentee: Nancy Bartlett 



Page 38 



5DPH0MDRE 

HALL Df TAME 




ANNA PEDERZANI 
Her celebrated family trait 
Is playing hard and shooting 
straight. 



HAROLD CARAMELLO 
He well deserves his portrait here, 
For he excelled in sports this 
year. 



ISABEL BROWN 
Three audiences she drove wild 
By crying, "Fireman, Save My 
Child!" 




^^--^ — -? 



ANN JEAN ARLENE LILLIAN 

In future years, we Sophomores deem, 
They'll lend support to every team. 




RUTH DALE 
Our worthy Red Cross captain sits 
And serves her country as she 
knit's. 



REMO LODI 
In oratory he surpassed 
Three members of the Senior 
Class. 






ROBERT AGNONE 
We're not the least bit hesitant 
In lauding our Class President. 



Page 39 





FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 



En guise d'introduction 

Honorables et chers lecteurs, 

Malgre les actualites formidables, qui se passent en France, et malgre 
tout ce qui arrive partout, nous ecrivons en francais avec la conviction que 
la France reprendra encore une fois son ancienne position dans le monde. 

Paris, une des plus belles villes de l'Europe, est decrite en montrant 
quelques nouveaux aspects a cause de la guerre. 

Aussi a cause de la guerre la vie a l'ecole n'est pas le meme que celle 
de l'annee derniere. Nous avons fait quelques observations a l'ecole et au 
dehors. Certaines sont tres amusantes. 

Nous avons ecrit quelques anecdotes aussi pour vous amuser et pour 
vous faire rire. 

Nous esperons que vous trouverez ces selections-ci tres interessantes. 

Bien a vous, 
t Anna Scotti '42 

Mon Journal De 

Paris D'autrefois et Paris D'aujourd'hui 

le dix mai, 1935: 

Les gens sont en foule sur les Champs-Elysees aujourd'hui comme je 
marche le long de l'avenue avec mon ami, Jean. Des personnes, gais et 
riants, s'amusent et parlent des incidents heureux qui viendront bientot. 
Ces Parisiens sont tres genereux et mon ami a donne meme un dollar au 
mendiant qui passe au milieu de la foule. Les touristes visitent les places 
historiques et les points d'interet comme l'Hotel des Invalides et comme la 
Cathedrale de Notre-Dame. Tout Paris et toute la France sont heureux au 
printemps de 1935. 

le dix mai, 1941: 

Encore les gens sont en foule sur les Champs-Elysees mais ils ne sont 
pas gais et joyeux comme ils l'etaient en l'annee 1935. Tout le monde est 
tranquille et sur les batiments publics, le drapeau Nazi avec le Swastika 
flotte. On place les soldats Nazis partout dans "La France Occupee." Tout 
Paris et toute la France ont une haine amere dans son coeur pour les 
ennemis qui ont vaincu leur patrie bien-aimee. Tout le monde sait la faim 
ou la saura quand l'hiver viendra. Mais bien que la France fut vaincue, le 
peuple de ce pays ne perdra pas l'espoir qu'on delivrera leur pays des mains 
de leur ennemis. 

David Briggs '42 

Page 42 



Un Paris Gai 

Oui, il y a de la musique dans le Paris gai, capitale de la France. Mais 
ce n'est pas la musique "a la francaise." Non, malheureusement, elle est la 
bruyante melodie des cafes de l'Allemagne. Les gens s'amusent. Les 
theatres et les cinemas sont encore ouverts. Mais les gens de France ne 
voient pas les presentations qu'ils aimeraient voir. lis ne peuvent pas lire 
ce qu'ils aimeraient lire. lis sont contents? Les universites sont pleins 
d'etudiants, apprenant des choses plus belles que la guerre. Beaucoup de 
ces etudiants sont les soldats Allemands, mais les choses continuent malgre 
ces conditions. La Seine coule toujours. Les femmes battent le pave pour 
voir les etalages dans les vitrines des magasins. Souvent les hommes se 
promenent le long des boulevards, regardant les places, les boutiques, et les 
eglises. Dans les pares, ou les enfants jouent, l'herbe, les arbres, et les 
fleurs croissent aussi. Paris semblant gai. Mais est-il vraiment gai? 

Laura Resnick '42 

Est-ce Paris? 

Du haut, en bas les etoiles d'hiver regardent une ville fracassee, — oui, 
fracassee — au moins, exterieurement, — mais son esprit est encore vivant! 
Une lamentation monte a leurs oreilles comme une mere qui sanglotte pour 
son enfant. A ce gemissement, les feux celestes semblent faire halte par 
pitie. lis entendent les debats chuchotes d'une riviere puissante. 

Et alors, les astres clignotent et ils se disent: 

"Cette ville la-bas ne peut pas etre la meme sur laquelle nous luisions! 
Ou le rire et les allumettes ont-elles disparu? Et les amoureux qui aimaient 
se promener dans les jardins au clair de la lune, qui murmuraient des 
niaiseries douces, ou sont-ils? Nous ne voyons plus les amants; nous 
n'entendons plus les mots tendres. Nous ne voyons que des bottes de fer; 
nns n'entendons que des ordres gutturaux! Qu'est-ce que e'est? Est-ce 
notre Paris, reellement?" 

Faith Millman '42 

Paris Hier et Aujourd'hui 

Le bruit brusque des chevaux dans la nuit, les feuilles fremissant sur 
les arbres du Champs-Elysees, ce sont les souvenirs qui me viennent quand 
je pense a la vieille ville que j'aimais. Les cafes sur les rues etaient pleins 
de gens riant et sont pleines de tumulte gaie d'une nation qui jouit de la 
vie de son mieux. 

Une marchande de fleurs crie ses merceries aux passants. Audessous 
des feux, l'odeur de marrons rotis flotte dans l'air. Je me demande si ce 
Paris reviendra. 

Aujourd'hui les Allemands sont a Paris: des soldats dans les cafes et 
de blondes jeunes femmes qui marchent sur les rues avec leurs "Baedekers" 
a la main. Au printemps, meme que les arbres ont de nouvelles robes vertes 
et la Seine passe tranquillement devant la Cathedrale de Notre-Dame, il n'y 
a pas le meme esprit de gaiete et de joie de vivre qui est si frangais. Peut- 
etre dans les annees qui viendront, Paris deviendra comme elle l'etait — 
la plus belle ville du monde. Elle deviendra encore le centre de tout 
l'univers. 

Lydia Mongan '42 

Page 43 



Quelques Observations 



Quels changements a l'ecole cette annee-ci! Quels sont ces change- 
ments? 

Est-ce que les eleves n'etudient pas? Mais non, c'est a cause de la 
guerre que les eleves sont tres occupes. II y a des eleves qui tricotent des 
bas et des mitaines pour les pauvres refugies. Des autres etudiants font des 
bandeaux pour La Croix Rouge. C'est pour une cause honorable ce 
travail-ci. 

Beaucoup d'etudiants ont achete des obligations epargnees et des 
timbres pour la defense de notre patrie. 

On dit qu'il y aura une penurie de papier bientot. Eh bien, les eleves 
ne devront pas ecrire trop, n'est-ce pas? 

Les filles ainees parlent toujours de leurs cavaliers qui sont soldats. 
Puisqu' il y a des soldats qui sejournent dans l'ancienne ecole de l'autre 
cote de la rue, les jeunes filles sont toujours a la fenetre. C'est l'uniforme, 
n'est-ce pas? Quelques soldats viennent a l'ecole pour manipuler les 
machines a ecrire. Des autres soldats viennent a l'ecole pour jouer dans 
le gymnase. 

Oui, il y a beaucoup de changements a l'ecole cette annee. 

Anna Scotti '42 

Le soldat et la petite fille 

Un jour dans la ville de Plymouth, un personne en passant sur la rue 
Lincoln la vieille ecole, qui est un poste militaire maintenant aurait pu voir 
cet extraordinaire double-garde se promenant de long en large devant le 
batiment. Un arme avec un fusil, l'autre avec une petite voiture. 

Tout le matin les deux gardes continuent a faire leurs devoirs. Le soldat 
et la petite fille. 

Bien qu'il ne fut pas possible pour moi d'entendre la conversation, mon 
imagination me dit que bien que le soldat ne parla a personne, beaucoup de 
questions ont ete posees et toujours l'inevitable "pourquoi"? 

Quand l'heure pour dejeuner arriva, la petite fille quitta le soldat, qui 
continua sa garde. 

Elle ne retourna pas pour continuer la garde avec son amie. 

Cette histoire prouve que quelque soit l'age, un homme en uniforme a 
son attraction pour les jeunes filles. 

Eh, bien, c'est la guerre! 

Virginia Lynch '42 



Cinq et Cinq Font Dix 



Un jour au printemps l'eleve Jacques etait tres mechant. Peut-etre la 
saison est la raison, mais qui sait? II n'a pas fait son devoir. 

"Qu'est-ce que c'est?" le maitre s'est eerie. "Nous n'avons pas fait nos 
devoirs?" Pauvre petit Jacques: pour le punir, il lui a fait ecrire dix 
phrases de penitence. Le maitre a dicte — "Nous sommes mechants, nous 
n'avons pas fait nos devoirs." 

Avec cette punition terrible, Jacques revient chez soi, la tete courbee 
en pensee. 

Page 44 



Vient le jour prochain, Jacques s'est presente au maitre, son papier a 
la main. Le maitre etudie le papier. En lettres rondes et fermes cinq 
phrases sont ecrites, c'est, tout. "Mais ou sont les autres?" demanda le 
maitre. 

"Monsieur," dit Jacques, "vous m'avez instruit! II faut que nous 
ecrivions dix phrases! Eh bien, vous completerez le papier, n'est-ce pas? 

Lydia Mongan '42 

Le Voyageur et Les Langues 

Tout le monde aime a voyager et voir les grandes et belles cathedrales 
et les longues avenues dans le monde. 

Dans une petite ville pres de Paris, il y a un petit hotel. Sur la porte 
une enseigne lit "Ici on parle l'anglais, l'espagnol, l'allemand, le russe, 
et l'italien." 

Un voyageur qui entre dans l'hotel demande au proprietaire, "Ou sont 
les interpretes?" 

"Les interpretes?" 

"Oui, l'enseigne sur la porte dit qu'on parle cinq langues etrangeres ici." 

"Mais oui, mais oui. On parle ces langues ici. Ce sont les voyageurs 
qui les parlent." 

David Briggs '42 

Charles et les quatre saisons 

Un jour, quand Charles etait a l'ecole, son professeur commenca a 
parler des saisons de l'annee. 

II dit, "Les quatres saisons sont l'ete, l'hiver, le printemps, et 
l'automne." Charles n'ecoutait pas. 

"En ete il fait chaud, en hiver il fait froid, au printemps on cueille le 
fruit, et en automne les feuilles tombent des arbres." Ensuite le professeur 
demande a Charles, "Quand est le meilleur temps pour cueillir les pommes? 

Charles hesita et ensuite il dit, "Le meilleur temps pour les pommes 
est quand le fermier est dans la maison et le chien de garde n'y est pas 
aussi." 

Gerald Longhi '42 



L'homme Content 

Sur un jardin superbe a Paris etait ecrit l'inscription suivante — Je 
donnerais ce jardin a l'homme qui est content. 

Un jeune homme, qui desira avoir ce jardin qui est. si beau, chercha 
le proprietaire. II le trouva. Tout de suite le proprietaire demanda — Etes- 
vous content? 

L'autre repliqua — Oui, je suis toujours content. 

Le vieillard dit — Non, vous n'etes pas content. Une personne qui 
desire quelque chose qui n'est pas a lui n'est pas content. 

Joan Holmes '42 

Page 45 



Georges Attend 



Georges n'etait jamais heureux a l'ecole. 

Un jour son pere lui a dit, "Georges, mon petit, qu'est-ce que tu fais 
a l'ecole? Est-ce que tu apprends a lire un peu?" 
"Non." 

"Est-ce que tu apprends a ecrire un peu?" 
"Non." 

"Eh bien, qu'est-ce que tu fais a l'ecole?" 
Georges repond a son pere, "Moi, j'attends l'heure de sortir!" 

Anna Scotti '42 

Un Cas Grave 

Un homme, Paul Dufour, alia chez son medecin pour voir pourquoi il 
ne dort pas. II dit qu'il se couche a dix ou onze heures. 

Le medecin demanda, "Vous ne pouvez pas dormir? Vous vous 
reveillez deux ou trois heures apres que vous vous couchez?" 

"Non, je dors jusqu'au matin." 

"Est-ce que vous vous levez tard ou de bonne heure?" 

M. Dufour dit, "Je me leve a neuf ou dix heures le matin, et la 
dimanche a midi." 

"Pourquoi me demandez-vous pourquoi vous ne dormez pas?" 

Paul Dufour repondit, "Parce que quand je veux me reposer pendant 
la journee je ne peux pas dormir. 

Charlotte Valler '42 








___ 9erslJ LoikJii 



Pa,ge 46 



LATIN SCHOLARS 

He built a bridge, he crossed the 

Rhine, 
A mighty band had he: 
So Caesar wrote in ancient times 
To show how great was he. 

And Cicero told of Catiline 
His life, his deeds, his end: 
His clear-cut style you skim with 

ease 
And little time need spend. 

At last you've reached the final 

year 
And Vergil lies before — 
And, though you find Aeneas good, 
He sometimes is a bore. 

How oft, I wonder, would these 

men 
In ghostly wrath arise 
If only they could hear the way 
We try to improvise. 

Gladys Cohen '43 



THE LATIN HOUR 

With apologies to Henry Longfellow 

Between my supper and bedtime, 
When my mother begins to 
glower, 
Comes a pause in the day's occu- 
pation 
That's known as the Latin Hour. 

I see from my seat at the table 
Verbs jumping. out by the pair; 

Queer "esse" and simple "rogare," 
And "fero" with parts like "fer." 

Do you think, O puzzling subjunc- 
tive, 

Because you come hard to me 
That such an old scholar as I am 

Is not a good match for thee? 

I'll have you fast in my brain cells, 
And will not let you depart, 

But inscribe you deep in my mem- 
ory 
And forget not even a part. 

And there will I keep you forever, 
Yes, forever and a day — 

Till the wall of knowledge shall 
crumble, 
And Latin shall moulder away. 

Jane Reynolds '43 



Georgius Canuccius S. D. Publio Tuscano 

Orbis terrae multum mutavit ab tempore ubi tibi scripsi. Turn omnia 
erant placidissima in orbe terrae, sed nunc bellum, ira Martis confectum, 
per orbem terrae vagatur. Mali viri, similes bellicoso Hannibali, et ignari 
se numquam victuros esse, nostram patriam delere et regnare orbem terrae 
temptant. Coniurationem, vagantem late, fecerunt, et iam multae parvae 
nationes, similes provinciis in Gallia, sub eorum imperio ceciderunt. Nunc 
America quoque in pugnam tracta est. Modi vitae nostrae bello pro liber- 
tate iurum hominis mutati sunt, et omnis civis patriae suae auxilio omnes 
suos labores pollicitus est. Brevi tempore ei mali dictatores deicientur et 
viri huius coniurationis, similes viris Catilinae coniurationis, multabuntur. 
Omnes cives, qui pacem amant, petunt diem cum omnes nationes sub Deo 
in condicionem novam libertatis invenient, et certe id imperium populi, ab 
populo, populo non ab orbe terrae numquam peribit. Die mihi qua condi- 
cione res in tua patria sint. Vale. 

George Canucci '42 



Page 47 



GRIDIRON REVIEW 



PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
was represented by a fine foot- 
ball team this year. The boys 
were noted for their spirit and 
cooperation with one another and 
with their coaches, Mr. John Walk- 
er and Mr. Mario Romano, who 
deserve much praise for the excel- 
lent record of the team. Captain 
Albert Post played stellar football 
through the season, and his versa- 
tility was an important factor in 
Plymouth victories. The first prac- 
tice was delayed this year, and the 
boys did not report until September 




8, twelve days before the first game. 



PLYMOUTH 6 — HINGHAM 

On September 20, Plymouth eked out a six to nothing win over a 
husky Hingham High team. The game was a scoreless tie until, in the last 
twenty seconds of the game, Hingham tried an aerial which was inter- 
cepted by Silvio Adamo. He raced sixty-five yards, and, with the aid of a 
good block by Arthur Moskos, scored the winning touchdown. 

PLYMOUTH 8 — ABINGTON 

After two years of decided supremacy over Plymouth gridiron teams, 
Abington High bowed in defeat. The Green and White came to Plymouth 
on September 27 with a fine following which expected to go home victori- 
ous. In the third period Silvio Adamo scampered around left end for the 
score. The try for the extra point failed, but two points were gained later 
when George Heath blocked an Abington kick and recovered in the end 
zone for a safety. 

PLYMOUTH 13 — ROCKLAND 19 

Plymouth High suffered its first loss when it traveled to Rockland on 
October 4, where, for the first time in twenty-one years, a Rockland eleven 
outscored a Plymouth High football team. Plymouth had a one-point 
lead at the half, but, with only ninety seconds of the third period gone, 
Harold Caramello, a sophomore, scored. Then Rockland scored twice in 
the last few minutes of play and assured itself of a victory. Despite the loss, 
the Plymouth boys showed that they could take as well as give it. 

PLYMOUTH 19 — BRIDGEWATER 6 

With a large following, Plymouth 
journeyed to Bridgewater on Octo- 
ber 18. Albert Post scored only 
once during the first half, but 
throughout the third quarter Plym- 
outh showed unquestionable su- 
periority. Plymouth reserves saw 
plenty of action during the last 
stanza, and Bridgewater scored 
once. Allen Longhi, a junior, gave 
a fine running exhibition, which 
won him a starting berth the fol- 
lowing Saturdav. 



t 






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-~_- . 





Page 48 



PLYMOUTH 6 — MIDDLEBORO 

Middleboro came to Stephens Field on October 25. The Orange and 
Black running attack was superb, and Plymouth was forced to fight for 
every inch gained. It was not until the second half that Plymouth tallied 
on a pass from Maccaferri to Post. Joseph Tavernelli, an end, won himself 
a starting position against Whitman because of his fine defensive play in 
this game. Captain Varney of Middleboro was outstanding in the Orange 
and Black offense. 

PLYMOUTH 20 — WHITMAN 

With four inches of mud on the playing field, Plymouth played its 
finest game of the season. Sport fans were amazed at the way Plymouth 
outclassed Whitman, which had previously been undefeated. Only once 
during the whole game did Whitman threaten to score, and then Plymouth 
stoutly held on its own twenty-yard line. Albert Post played the best game 
of his career, scoring three times and adding one point after a touchdown. 
It was, indeed, a happy day for Plymouth High School. 

PLYMOUTH 37 — NANTUCKET 

Plymouth was highly favored over the Islanders, and the outcome did 
not create a surprise. Plymouth collected only twelve points in the first 
half. However, the latter periods produced some great passing by Harold 
Maccaferri and some fine running by Post and Adamo, which accounted for 
the heavy scoring. 

PLYMOUTH 7 — WEYMOUTH 28 

Plymouth tasted defeat for the second time during the season at the 
hands of a very powerful Weymouth High School football team. The Plym- 
outh team was without the services of their ace passer, Harold Maccaferri, 
yet they scored on Weymouth as much as has any other opponent this year. 
The Plymouth score was the result of a blocked kick by George Heath with 
Joseph Tavernelli recovering for Plymouth. With three straight line 
plunges, Captain Post ran for the touchdown and added the extra point. 
Ted Martin gave a masterful kicking performance, while George Butters 
did commendable work backing up the line. 

. . STATISTICS . . 

SCORING: Plymouth scored 116 points against opposition. 

Opposition scored 53 points against Plymouth. 
Plymouth won six games and lost two. 
Plymouth scored on all opposition. 
Five teams failed to score on Plymouth. 



INDIVIDUAL SCORING: 




Points after 












Touchdowns 


Touchdoion 


Total 






Albert Post 


10 


4 




64 






Silvio Adamo 


6 


1 




37 






Harold Maccaferri 


1 


1 




7 






Harold 


Caramello 


1 


o . 




6 






George 


Heath 


safety 


Total 




2 
116 




Date 




Opposition 




Place 


P.H. 


S. 


Opp 


Sept. 20 




Hingham 




Away 


6 







Sept. 27 




Abington 




Here 


8 







Oct. 4 




Rockland 




Away 


13 




19 


Oct. 18 




Bridgewater 




Away 


19 




6 


Oct. 25 




Middleboro 




Here 


6 







Nov. 1 




Whitman 




Here 


20 







Nov. 8 




Nantucket 




Away 


37 







Nov. 15 




Weymouth 




Away 
Total 


7 
116 




28 
53 



Page 49 




FOOTBALL 

Front Row: George Heath, George Butters, Benjamin Brewster, Albert Post, Silvio 
Adamo, Theodore Martin, Charles Peterson 

Second Row: Mr. Walker, Harold Maccaferri, Murdock Christie, Joseph Tavernelli, 
Richard Wirtzburger, Harold Caramello, Loring Belcher, Mr. Romano 

Third Row: Allen Longhi, Theodore Collas, Henry Carvalho, Ronald Butterfield. Sid- 
ney Shwom, Alvin DeCost, Arthur Moskos 




TRACK 

Front Row: Edmund Axford, Roger Whiting, John Kelley 

Second Row: Paul Brewster, Walter St. George, Mr. Guidaboni, Evan Yates, William 
Dern 



Page 50 



OFF THE BACKBOARDS 




A' 



N OTHER fine basketball 
team proved its mettle this 
year by winning eleven 
games out of a possible 
twenty during an exceptionally 
tough schedule. Pre-season predic- 
tions placed Plymouth on the weak 
side of the fence, but the "experts" 
quickly changed their minds when 
the Blue and White nosed out a 
very strong Alumni team 54-21. 
The season's initial week was com- 
pleted with two more victories, one 
over a clever Abington High School 
team and another over Hyannis. 
Later in the season, Hyannis managed to stop our lads by a score of 35-30, 
but Abington was scalped 55-26. 

Plymouth's early victory streak continued with a 32-25 win over 
Hingham, but in the next contest it was halted by Rockland High. Rockland 
overcame an early Plymouth lead to squeeze in a last-minute 30-26 win. 
It was a heart-breaking game for Plymouth to lose, especially when in the 
next encounter Rockland nipped Plymouth again in a thrilling overtime 
game at Rockland by a score of 35-32. 

The outcome of the game at Stoughton threw a pail of water on 
Plymouth's red hot tournament hopes as the Shiretowners bowed to last 
year's tournament champs, score 55-27. However, Plymouth overwhelmed 
East Bridgewater in both games of the series. North Quincy, a new school 
on Plymouth's schedule, snatched two victories from the Blue and White, 
while another recent newcomer, North Attleboro, bowed twice. After 
swamping Bridgewater at Plymouth, the Shiretowners played a disappoint- 
ing game at Bridgewater, losing the contest 33-25. 

Plymouth ended its regular schedule by defeating Stoughton High 
School, the South Shore Champions, by a score of 30-28 at Plymouth. 

. . The South Shore Tournament . . 

IN the first round of the tourna- 
ment, Plymouth was pitted 
against Abington High School. The 
Blue and White experienced great 
difficulty in downing the Green and 
White. However, Plymouth 
emerged from the final stanza as 
the victor by a good margin of 
37-25. Gerald Romano led the 
Shiretowners' attack with fifteen 
points to his credit, while Captain 
Pederzani contributed thirteen 
points toward the victory. 

Plymouth encountered Middle- 
boro High School in the semi-finals. 

Both squads were at the peak of their performance, and the resulting 
contest was a thriller. The first three periods featured no lead by either 
team, but a sustained Plymouth drive in the final stanza ended the contest 
in another Plymouth win by a score of 34-29. 




Page 51 



For a second time in three consecutive years the Shiretowners reached 
the finals. Their opponent this year was Stoughton High School. Led by 
Captain Pederzani, who accumulated twenty points during the game, Plym- 
outh remained only four points short of a tie at the end of the first half. 
During the remaining periods, Stoughton's height began to tell on the 
Plymouth lads as Stoughton started grabbing backboard rebounds and 
turning them into scores. When the final whistle blew, Stoughton had 
retained its South Shore Championship for another year by a score of 44-30. 







BASKETBALL 


SCHEDULE 1941- 


1942 


Score 


Date 




Opponent 


Place 


Opp. 


P.H.S. 


December 


23 


Alumni 


Here 


51 


54 


January- 


2 


Abington 


Away 


28 


36 


January 


6 


Hyannis 


Here 


29 


43 


January 


7 


Hingham 


Away 


25 


32 


January 


9 


Rockland 


Here 


30 


26 


January 


13 


Stoughton 


Away 


55 


27 


January 


14 


N. Attleboro 


Away 


31 


34 


January 


16 


Bridgewater 


Here 


21 


53 


January 


20 


Rockland 


Away 


35 


32 (overtime 


January 


23 


E. Bridgewater 


Here 


19 


47 


January 


27 


E. Bridgewater 


Away 


33 


45 


January 


30 


North Quincy 


Away 


30 


19 


February 


3 


North Quincy 


Here 


35 


28 


February 


6 


Middleboro 


Away 


42 


38 


February 


10 


Hyannis 


Away 


35 


30 


February 


13 


N. Attleboro 


Here 


32 


38 


February 


17 


Bridgewater 


Away 


33 


25 


February 


20 


Hingham 


Here 


24 


23 


February 


24 


Abington 


Here 


26 


55 


February 


27 


Stoughton 


Here 


28 


30 








Total 


642 


712 






BROCKTON TOURNAMENT 






March 


7 


Abington 


1st round 


25 


37 


March 


13 


Middleboro 


semi-finals 


39 


44 


March 


14 


Stoughton 


finals 


44 


30 








Total 


108 


111 







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BASKETBALL 

Left to Right: Arthur Pederzani, Richard Wirtzburger, Joseph Tavernelli. Robert 
Cingolani, Harold Caramello. Roger Whiting. George Butters. Gerald Romano. 
David Maccaferri, Alfred Holmes, Mr. Walker 



Page 52 



. . PUGNO PENS A NOTE . . 

Lincoln Street Kennels 
Plymouth, Massachusetts 
September '41 — April '42 
Dear Sport Fans: 

First I must explain who I am, and why I am writing this letter. I'm 
a wooden Boston bull-dog adopted by the hockey girls at the beginning of 
their season. Upon adoption, I was christened "Pugno" (I fight!) and I then 
became their official mascot. I travelled about with them to share victories 
and defeats, and I can therefore give you first-hand information concern- 
ing their sports activities. 

The girls had an excellent program this fall in which many girls par- 
ticipated in class and school games. After several weeks of stick-work and 
scrimmages the first and second team line-ups were chosen. As usual, 
most of the first team were Seniors, but there were four Juniors who earned 
positions on this team and I, for one, admit that they were GOOD! 

"Scooping" around the records, I find that this team opened the season 

with the most decisive victory over 
Pembroke and the most devastating 
defeat from the sticks of Scituate 
that has been experienced for many 
years. I was there behind the goal 
posts yipping for the girls, and, 
even though they lost, I'm dog- 
matic enough to state that they 
took their defeat like real sports- 
men. I am also still wagging my 
tail with pride and joy, because this 
was the only defeat during the en- 
tire season. They played ten games, 
winning six, tying three, and losing one. Perhaps I should bark a reminder 
to the girls that they give due credit to their practise opponents, for the 
second team played through the season undefeated and unscored upon. 
The girls and I achieved one distinction — we were the first team to 
engage in a free-for-all scrimmage with the football boys. The spectators 
shrieked with laughter when the Coach and his squad dashed on the field, 
appropriately uniformed in romper suits and kerchiefs, ready to beat the 
girls at their own game. Coach Walker, promptly nicknamed the "Red 
Terror," was outstanding in Mrs. Garvin's red instructor's tunic. He fought 
everywhere for the ball, and finally succeeded in securing it for a solo 
dash that tied the score. During the game the boys were a bit rough, but 
the girls managed to hold their own. 

The hockey season ended on Thanksgiving morning when a surpris- 
ingly large number of Alumnae played against the school team. After a 
hard hour of battling, my team ended their schedule with a 2-0 victory. 

The fresh air and sunshine, the exercise in barking, and the food at 

Page 53 




Dutchland Farm stands have improved my health to such an extent that I 
shall surely rear all my puppies to be future Plymouth mascots. 

Aft^r being in the dog-house for two weeks, I finally crawled out and 
sniffed about in search of a ball — a basketball. It was then that I found 
fifty girls ready to participate in intramural games. 

On Washington's birthday my girls played their first game against the 
Alumnae, and won by a 24-17 score. Next I witnessed an unusually interest- 
ing play-day game in the company of Superintendent Burr F. Jones and 
Mr. Anson B. Handy, President of Hyannis State Teachers College, in the 
school gymnasium. Plymouth and Hyannis girls formed four Color Teams 
so that there were three girls from each school on a team. After two 
games had been played, the winners competed in a final game for the 
championship. The records showed that of the total eighty-eight points 
scored during the entire afternoon, Plymouth girls made forty-seven points 
and that Captain Mary Mulcahy was among the high scorers. 

A series of interscholastic class games was played with Middleboro, 
Bourne, Hingham, and Scituate in which Plymouth teams had an oppor- 
tunity to observe the technique of their opponents, improve their own 
skills, and make many new friends. The only defeat for the senior team, 
and a one-point one at that, was inflicted by the Scituate girls, the South 
Shore Champions of 1942. 

Fine spring days ushered in badminton, bowling, shuffleboard, and 
ping pong tournaments. These sports attracted many students — even the 
boys, who attempted to show the girls the RIGHT way to play. 

In closing, I wish to thank the girls for the many exciting afternoons 
I spent with them, and to express the hope that next year's teams will see 
fit to adopt me as their mascot. 

Doggedly yours, 

Pugno 




Fage 54 




HOCKEY 

Front Row: Helen Shaw, Plorinda Leal, Marjorie Neal, Mary Goddard, Anna Scotti, 
Frances Barlow, Pauline Holmes, Dolores Tarantino 

Second Row: Mary Capozucca, Janice Cavicchi, Ann MacLeod, Betsey McCosh, Jean 
Boutin, Mrs. Garvin, Rose Brigida, Janice Knight, Naomi McNeil, Faith Millman, 
Mary Taddia 

Third Row: Joan Chiari, Natalie Sampson, Laura Resnick, Marion Clark, Marie 
Sance, Anna Pederzani, Marcia Holmes, Gloria Tracy, Elide Benati, Norma John- 
son, Peggy Youngman, Doris Bergonzini, Shirley Collins 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

Front Row: Phyllis Ginhold, Marie Martinelli, Mary Goddard, Mary Mulcahy, Flor- 

inda Leal, Anna Scotti 
Second Row: Helen Sherman, Betsey McCosh, Naomi McNeil, Rose Brigida, Janice 

Knight, Jean Boutin, Eleanor Nicoli, Peggy Youngman 
Third Row: Lillian Shaw, Joan Eldridge, Elide Benati, Anna Pederzani, Joan Chiari, 

Natalie Sampson, Jean Maccaferri, Nancy Bartlett 
Absentees: Mrs. Garvin, Marcia Brooks 

Page 55 



^AfliAmnL v I oh 



Nichols Junior College 
Dudley, Massachusetts 

Dear Alumni Editors, ^ 

After graduating from P. H. S. in 1935, I entered the College of Liberal 
Arts at Boston University; at the end of my sophomore year, I transferred 
to Pembroke College, where I majored in French language and literature. 

During my senior year I was appointed student assistant in the college 
library. This work interested me so much that I decided to become a libra- 
rian. 

In the year following graduation from Brown (of which Pembroke 
College is a part) , I worked as a salesgirl at the Shepard Store in Provi- 
dence, and after Christmas I returned to Plymouth to take a position as a 
volunteer worker in the Loring Reading Room. In June I became a guide 
at Pilgrim Hall. 

In September, 1940, I obtained a position as librarian at Nichols Junior 
College, a college of business administration for young men. The work is 
very interesting, but I find after a year and a half that I still have much to 
learn about the many phases of business studied here. During my time 
off I enjoy the sports programs, concerts, plays, and all other extra- 
curricular activities, so I feel more like a student than a librarian. 

Yours very sincerely, 

Lucy M. Holmes 

Apt. E, Russell Building 

-^ .. . _. ,., Plvmouth, Massachusetts 

Dear Alumni Editors, 

Why the career of the President of the Class of 1923 has not been more 
distinguished can be readily explained by any of my classmates, who know 
that I was elected by a fluke, the two more popular and worthy candidates 
splitting the vote, allowing the least worthy to win. 

After graduating from Plymouth High, I attended State College in 
Lewiston, Maine, earning my tuition and other expenses by writing for the 
Lewiston Sun, and by performing many humbler tasks. Cross-country 
running, winter sports, and the literary editorship of the college paper 
were my principal campus activities. 

After my sophomore year, I did not return to college for financial 
reasons, but I remained in Plymouth, earning money in various ways. The 
following fall, I entered Bowdoin College as a Junior, joined the Sigma 
Nu fraternity, and continued my studies and college activities. I was 
graduated with honors in 1928. 

Immediately after my graduation, I went to New York, to work in a 
large advertising agency. After three years as a copywriter, I was able to 
go abroad. In Paris, I studied at the Alliance Frangaise, the University of 
Paris, and the Ecole de Louvre. I received a teaching fellowship at the 
Ecole de Garcons in Rennes, with the privilege of continuing my studies 
at the University of Rennes. 

Page 56 



Upon my return from Europe, I wrote for the Plymouth County 
News, and later did similar work for the Old Colony Memorial. Antici- 
pating at that time the military crisis which is only now upon us, I enlisted 
in the U. S. Army, and served in Hawaii, eventually taking charge of opera- 
tions for the 19th Pursuit Squadron. 

After three years in the army, I returned to civilian life and the Old 
Colony Memorial. I am now editing a newspaper in Weymouth, and 
writing some of the editorials for the Plymouth paper. 

Best wishes to you all, 

E. Reynolds Mosman, '23 



At Sea 

Dear Alumni Editors, January 22 ' 1942 

After leaving P. H. S. in 1929, I was granted the degree of B. S. in 
Mechanical Engineering at Northeastern University in 1934. I was then 
an engineer at the Plymouth Cordage Company until May, 1937, at which 
time I became a Steam Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspector for the Mutual 
Boiler Insurance Company of Boston. 

In 1938, I was lucky enough to convince a young lady from Taunton, 
named Evelyn Farrow, that "Yes" was the right answer. After living 
in Jamaica Plain less than two years, we designed and built our own home 
in Natick. 

I continued to growl in true Inspector fashion about boiler ailments 
from Massachusetts to Wisconsin until May, 1941, when Uncle Sam took 
me off the reserve list and ordered me to active duty as an Ensign in the 
U. S. Navy. 

When I return, I'll be able to spin yarns on end, but many considera- 
tions preclude that now. 

Thank you for the opportunity to edge my way into the columns of 
The Pilgrim again. As an old Business Manager, of course I realize that a 
good two-inch ad would be far more valuable. 

Sincerely, 

Morton S. Pratt 



World Radio University 

Boston, Massachusetts 

December 2, 1941 
Dear Alumni Editors, 

Since the rosy days of Graduation, I've gone through Boston Uni- 
versity, and taken courses at Harvard and University Extension. I got 
my first job as cub reporter on the Cambridge Chronicle-Sun, covering 
everything from women's club meetings to police news and City Hall. 
Then I worked on the late-lamented Boston Evening Transcript, covering 
Cambridge and special assignments— and loving every moment of it. 

For one year, I combined newspaper work with the job of teaching 
journalism to students at the Cambridge Preparatory School. Within a 
few months I had shifted my field entirely and gone into radio. 

Page 57 



Here at Shortwave Station WRUL, I have charge of the correspondence 
from the Americas and countries abroad. It is a completely fascinating 
job. In one day, you find yourself transported, through the pages of 
letters, from the Back Bay to a little apartment in Turkey where a Medical 
student and his wife live, listening to WRUL; you go to Ankara, The 
Hague, to Zurich, to Oslo, occupied France . . . Our letters are from 
many lands, censored and uncensored, and in many languages. It makes 
you feel as though you had been in those countries, known the people, 
to read their intimate and friendly letters! And now and then, these 
good, unseen friends send in small tokens, much cherished because we 
know the sentiment behind them. 

After working hours, I do some writing — a few plays, Children's 
plays and stories, some poetry. And I have my home and a husband — 
who is a newspaper editor — and that keeps me quite busy. We both 
collect antiques and enjoy refinishing them in the cellar! 

I remember with very real appreciation the teachers in Plymouth 
High School who gave so generously of their own knowledge and guid- 
ance, and would like to send each one my very best wishes. 

Sincerely yours, 

E. Harriett Donlevy 

(Mrs. George Edward Connor) 



Dear Alumni Editors, 

The year following my graduation, I remained as a post-graduate and 
a general nuisance to the faculty. The next summer I started my career 
as a soda clerk, and that fall I was given an opportunity to report for a 
newspaper. 

I was doing extremely well, when one evening I was assigned to 
"cover" a large society party in a quaint little Cape Cod town. Having 
attended this type of party on numerous previous occasions, and having a 
prior engagement to sit in on a hand of pinochle, I wrote the story of the 
party, and sent it to the press the afternoon before the party was to take 
place. The hostess caught the measles and cancelled the party, and the 
editor cancelled my contract. 

Soon, I received a job on the "Banana Ro} r al Production Line" at the 
Camp Edwards canteen. My job, with three helpers, was to put the 
whipped cream, cherries, and nuts on the huge sundaes as they rolled down 
the endless chain. One day, during a heated game of "gin-rummy," the 
four of us allowed twenty dishes to shoot through unadorned. 

I next took a position as restaurant manager in the recreation building 
at The U. S. Naval Air Station at Quonset Point, R. I., but it was of short 
duration; I am now back making sodas at the Howard Johnson stand in 
West Roxbury, and intend next year to further my education in some insti- 
tution of higher learning. 

Best of luck to the class of '42! 

Richard H. Tubbs 
President, Class of 1939 

Page 58 



West Wareham, Massachusetts 
Dear Alumni Editors, Janar y U > 1942 

Since I graduated in June, 1939, I have been in the cranberry business 
with my father; I have found this work very interesting, and I shall, no 
doubt, continue to grow cranberries as long as they are saleable. 

Beyond the usual running around which every young fellow does, 
cranberries have been the center of my activities, and will continue to be, 
excepting, of course, any participation in the present world conflict which 
I may take. I could describe the processes involved in growing cranberries, 
but that would make a long and uninteresting story for your readers. 

Sincerely yours, 

Nahum H. Morse 



Baltimore, Maryland 

t^. A1 . -,-, ,., December 3, 1941 

Dear Alumni Editors, 

After graduating from high school, I spent the summer working, and in 
the fall of 1937, entered Radcliffe College. I majored in English literature, 
but found that my interest was beginning to be taken up more by modern 
American literature. Therefore my thesis was written on John Dos Passos' 
trilogy, "U. S. A." 

I took as many writing courses as possible, and writing remains one of 
my chief interests. 

In the fall of my senior year I was married to Robert Pecsok, who had 
graduated from Harvard the year before, and who was in training for 
supervisory work at Proctor and Gamble, here in Baltimore. 

After I received my A. B. degree last June, I came to Baltimore; I want 
to study for another degree, so, if all goes well, I shall begin in February 
to work towards my master's degree at Johns Hopkins University. 

I wish you all much success with The Pilgrim. It does not seem so 
very long ago that I was worrying about it, but it was pleasant work and 
profitable, as I learned later when my experience helped me in my labors 
for Radcliffe's weekly paper, and its magazine, "ETC." 

Sincerely, 

Mary Bodell Pecsok 
(Mrs. Robert L. Pecsok) 

KEY TO "WHO'S WHO?" 

No. Name No. Name 

1. Edwin Bastoni 13. Marie Martinelli 

2. Frances Barlow 14. Betty Viets 

3. Bernard Boudrot 15. Janie Franks 

4 Tommy Brewer 16. Connie Murray 

5. Marcia Brooks 17. Faith Millman 

6. Harold DeCarli 18. Lydia Mongan 

7. Mary C. Donovan 19. Marcia Holmes 

8. Samuel Franc 20. Ronald Butterfield 

9. Mary Goddard 21. Anna Scotti 

10. Stewart Hatch 22. Helen Shaw 

11. Muriel Humphrey 23. Joan Holmes 

12. Virginia Lynch 24. Roger Whiting 

25. Richard Parks 

Page 59 



THE MUSICOLUMN 

Plymouth . . . September, 1941 

THE GIRLS' SEXTET was again organized, with three new mem- 
bers to replace graduates — sopranos, Marjorie Neal and Faith 
Millman; second sopranos, Cynthia Holmes and Frances Nutter- 
ville; altos, Doris Bergonzini and Jane Reynolds, with Norma Gilli as 
accompanist. 
Plymouth . . . September, 1941 

A mixed choral group replaced the boys' glee club of former years. 
Plymouth . . . January 19, 1942 

^ In its first public appearance of the year, the Sextet 

% jf entertained The Woman's Alliance at the Baptist 

J**W Wk Church. 

fr^ mET Plymouth . . . February (i, 1942 

mnWggM \ A number of teachers and students of the Junior and 

|^^^^ Senior High Schools met at the railroad station to say 

goodbye to Director John Pacheco, and the band 

played several selections for him as he left to enter the U. S. Army. 

Plymouth . . . February 10, 1942 

The Girls' Sextet went to Harwichport to entertain the Woman's Club, 
and received high praise for its program. 
Plymouth . . . February, 1942 

Mr. Vincent De Benedictis arrived to assume the responsibilities of Mr. 
John Pacheco as director of the band and orchestra. 
Plymouth . . . February 11 and 12, 1942 

The musical and dramatic groups of the school com- 
bined to present the Gay Nineties Review. The project 
was thoroughly enjoyed by all who took part in it. 
Plymouth . . . February 14, 1942 

The Sextet, accompanied by Miss Beatrice Hunt, went 
to Boston to participate in a broadcast from Station WEEI. The 
group received many compliments and learned much from the 
experience. 
Plymouth . . . March 18-22, 1942 

A group of sixteen students, accompanied by Miss Beatrice Hunt, left 
early on a Wednesday morning to attend the All New England Music 
Festival held at Keene, New Hampshire. Most of the 
four days was spent in rehearsal for the concerts to 
be given on March 21. On that Saturday, the group 
sang in a very successful afternoon and evening con- 
cert. Not only did the group make many new friends, 
but it benefited from an entirely new musical 
experience. 
Plymouth . . . March 25, 1942 

An all-musical assembly was presented to the school, in which the 
band, glee club, mixed choral group and Sextet took part. The student 
body joined in the singing of familiar songs and thoroughly enjoyed 
the period. 

Page 60 






ACTIVITIES 



Page 61 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Dear Diary, 

September — 

The portals of Plymouth High were thrown open, a few days later 
this year than has been the custom, to admit once again the inquisitive 
sophomores, jubilant juniors, and sage seniors. 

The first week passed smoothly with the distribution of textbooks, sur- 
prisingly lenient home assignments, and the renewal of friendships inter- 
rupted by summer. 

When pupils arrived at the sad, sad conclusion that vacation was a 
thing of the recent past but far-distant future, they began to consider 
participating in the clubs and sports that make school life enjoyable. Of 
course, by that time football practice was well under way. 

October — 

A Book Club, a new enterprise, has been inaugurated with Miss Margie 
Wilber in charge. This makes it possible for the students to obtain a col- 
lection of the classics at a reasonable cost. Possibly it will put an end 
to scurrying down to the library on the Thursday night before book-report 
Friday. 

The Science Club, under Mr. John Packard's direction, held its first 
meeting. From all accounts it would appear that this is one organization 
which can flourish without any assistance from the so-called fairer sex. 

The drum majors were given instruction in strutting and twirling in 
preparation for exhibitions at football games. They, as well as the band, 
received smart new blue and white uniforms. 




SCIENCE CLUB 

Front Row: Harold Hayward, Malcolm Chamberlain, William Winter, Frederic Bliss, 

Bernard Brabant, Philip Manchester, Robert MacDcnagh 
Second Row: Robert Arnold, Ralph Fortini, Norman Gifford. Andrew DieMin. Arthur 

Tache, Mr. Packard 
Third Row: Joseph Sylvia, William Holmes, Loring Belcher, Robert VanAmburgh. 

Edward Penn, Bernard Holmes 



Page 62 



Finally, on the last day of the month, the first disastrous marking 
period terminated. Everyone, that is, nearly everyone, left for home at 
the close of the day resolved to labor much more conscientiously during 
the next term. 




TEN-CENT-A-VVEEK COLLECTORS 
Front Row: Muriel Humphrey, Agnes Emond, William Lamborghini, Manuel Pimen- 

tal, Ann Smith, Rita Fillion 
Second Row: Richard Wirtzburger, Albert Hatton, Mr. Bagnall, Anna Pederzani, 

David Crawley, Joseph Tavernelli, Benjamin Brewster 
Third Row: Frances Nutterville, Ralph Fortini, George Canucci, Alvan Testoni, Remo 

Lodi, Elizabeth Heath 




BANKERS 

Front Row: Edmund Axford, George Holman, Miss Kelly, Remo Lodi, Edwin Baker 
Second Row: John Souza, Richard Wall, Paul Brewster, Ruez Gallerani, Herbert 

Burnham, Joseph Bergamini 
Third Row: Walter St. George, Richard Gavonc, Richard Wirtzburger, John Nutter- 
ville, Arthur Moskos 

Page 63 



November — 

This month witnessed, among other things, a successful Red Cross 
Drive, election of senior class officers, and an enthusiastic pep assembly. 
A song by a quartet of male faculty members, accompanied by the band, 
caused excitement that nothing could quell. 

The annual Thanksgiving assembly was held on the eighteenth with 
the orchestra and mixed chorus providing the music. The participants were 
Isabelle Pierson, Robert Van Amburgh, Jane Reynolds, and Malcolm 
Chamberlain. 




ORCHESTRA 

Front Row: Evan Yates, Norma Gilli, Evelyn Fisk, Mr. De Benedictis, Gloria Longhi. 

Virginia Reynolds, Joan Eldridge 
Second Row: Charles Tourgee, Alvan Testoni, Charles Stasinos. Milton Glassman, 

Richard Drew 
Third Row: Nicholas Stasinos, Alfred Holmes, Walter St. George, Howard Haire 

December — 

Some of the talented and some not so talented hied themselves down 
to the auditorium one Tuesday evening to take part in the Dramatic Club's 
Amateur Night. The contestants seemed to find it enjoyable, whether 
applauded or not. 

A film entitled "Finding Your Life Work" was shown to all pupils in 
the hope of aiding some of them in deciding on their future vocations. 

A new library feature was introduced this month — "The Library 
News Bulletin." It offers a "Favorites" page, "Your Public Library," "Fac- 
ulty and Pupil suggestions," "Your Job — Your Life," and "The Hobby Spot." 
It is distributed to home room teachers on the first of the month. Much 
credit for this new endeavor goes to Edward Cavicchi, Barbara Maloon, 
and Marie Martinelli working under the direction of Mr. Arthur Pyle. 

Tryouts for the Christmas play, "No Room in the Hotel," were held by 
the Dramatic Club, and characters, as well as committees for make-up, 
costumes, properties, and programs, were chosen. 

The annual sale of Christmas Seals was sponsored by the Student 
Activities Society. 



Page 64 




DRAMATIC CLUB 

Front Row: Jane Reynolds, Gladys Cohen, Isabel Brown, Marcia Brooks, Phyllis Law- 
day, Barbara Pish, Joan Eldridge, Jean Boutin, Laura Resnick 

Second Row: Betty Viets, Shirley Collins, Mary Bearhope, Marjoria Neal, Ruth Dale, 
Miss Moore, Beverly Feinberg, Jennette Pranks, Florinda Leal, Constance Arm- 
strong, Barbara Lee 

Third Row: Cynthia Holmes, Beverly Armstrong, Ruth Morton, Faith Millman, 
Naomi McNeil, Lillian Shaw, Joan Chiari, Rose Brigida, Olive Harlow, Betsey 
McCosh, Doris Bergonzini, Louise Thomas 

Fourth Row: Harold Hayward, Malcolm Chamberlain, Ronald Butterfield, Robert 
Cook, Philip Manchester, Edward Cavicchi, Richard Kearsley, David Briggs, 
Milton Glassman 

Absentee: David Crawley 




LIBRARY RESEARCH 

Front Row: Arleen Linton, Phyllis Lawday, Mr. Pyle 

Second Row: David Briggs, Ronald Butterfield, Marie Martinelli, Barbara Maloon, 
Edward Cavicchi 



Page 65 



At a special assembly, Mr. Mongan urged the buying of war bonds, 
and representatives from two of the local banks were on hand to answer all 
questions relating to their purchase. 

The members of The Pilgrim staff invited Mrs. Lois Palches, a local 
poet, to read some of her work to fourth-period English classes. Since 
poetry assignments loomed menacingly in the too-near future, many 
students were at least willing to be helped by her presentation of rhyme 
patterns and subject matter. 

The school band, marching up Main Street in full uniforms in Decem- 
ber, caused no little bewilderment among the townspeople. However, fur- 
rowed brows were smoothed by the explanation appearing on a banner an- 
nouncing a coming current events lecture by Mr. Anton DeHaas, sponsored 
by the band. The talk had to be cancelled because Mr. DeHaas was sum- 
moned to Washington. 

All pupils greatly enjoyed an assembly featuring Pitt Parker, the crayon 
wizard who, as he drew pictures, gave a talk both entertaining and educa- 
tional. 

At the S. A. S. meeting, reports on the Hospital Thanksgiving Drive and 
Christmas Seal Sale were given. Discussion on the money-making project 
of the year, the Gay Nineties Revue, was started. 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

Front Row: Gino Borsari, Edwin Bastoni, Robert Agnone. George Canucci. Paul 

Brewster 
Second Row: Agnes Emond, Mary Goddard. Harold DeCarli. Robert Wilson, Benjamin 

Brewster, Anna Scotti, Gladys Cohen 
Third Row: Miss Locklin, Joan Holmes, William MacDonald. Mr. Mongan. Mr. 

Romano, Theodore Martin, Naomi McNeil, Miss Brown. Miss Rafter 
Fourth Row: Ralph Fortini, Bernard Verre, Jean Maccaferri. Mary Marvelli, Jennette 

Franks, Anna Pederzani, Elide Benati, Jean Boutin. Albert Post, Harold Maccaferri 
Fifth Row: Roger Whiting, Bernard Kritzmacher, Malcolm Chamberlain, Richard 

Kearsley, Harold Hayward, William Lamborghini, George Radcliffe, Richard 

Wirtzburger 



Page 66 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Front Row: Norma Gilli, Cynthia Holmes, Shirley Davies, Agnes Perry, Julia Andrews, 
Betty Curtin, Betty Viets, Jean Boutin, Naomi McNeil, Elizabeth Heath, Priscilla 
Crawley, Arlene Bourne 

Second Row: Isabel Brown, Faith Millman, Frances Nutterville, Louise Thomas, Bar- 
bara Carmichael, Olive Harlow, Doris Bergonzini, Gladys Cohen, Barbara Fish, 
Lois Jesse, Nancy Bartlett 

Third Row: Bernadette Murphy, Joan Eldridge, Beverly Feinberg, Jane Reynolds, 
Ruth Morton, Virginia Reynolds, Arline White, Verna Shaw, Florine Schortman, 
Janet Holman, Laura Resnick, Ruth Pederzani, Dolores Tarantino, Martha Kallio, 
Gloria Longhi, Miss Hunt 

Fourth Row: Corinne Jenney, Helen Sherman, Virginia Drew, Joan Chiari, Lillian 
Shaw, Anna Pederzani, Phyllis Lawday, Marjorie Neal, Ruth Dale, Mary Ander- 
son, Priscilla Rowe, Gloria Borghesani, Agnes Mazzanti, Constance Armstrong, 
Pamela Damment 




GIRLS' SEXTET 

Front Row: Cynthia Holmes, Marjorie Neal, Faith Millman 

Second. Row: Doris Bergonzini, Norma Gilli, Jane Reynolds, Frances Nutterville 



Page 67 



During November and December, Junior Red Cross knitters, under 
the direction of Mrs. Miriam Raymond, made fifty-eight hanks of yarn into 
twenty-four three-piece suits for three-year olds. In addition to these, the 
girls produced one hundred and four pairs of mittens. Fifty-five woolen 
skirts and twenty-five girls' dresses were made for the Red Cross under the 
supervision of Miss Viola Boucher. 

The final and most exciting event of the month was the Football Dance, 
held in the gymnasium on the twenty-third. The profits, which were 
insured by two weeks of unforgettable radio advertising, were to finance 
the team's trip to a hockey game in Boston. 
January — 

Some very lethargic pupils returned to school hoping to use the first 
few days of the new term to recuperate from the holidays. 

Recults of the Christmas Seal Drive were announced as thirty-five 
dollars and twenty-five cents. 

The faculty members began a basic course in First Aid dealing with 
such treatments as might be necessary in the event of an air raid or similar 
emergency. 

Tryouts for the melodrama, "Fireman, Save My Child," to be presented 
as part of the Gay Nineties Revue, were held by Miss Dorris Moore. 

Some of the girls spent several afternoons rolling bandages for the Red 
Cross. 

The sophomores rather tardily elected their officers for the year. 

On the twenty-first, the staff of The Pilgrim entertained two hundred 
members of the Southeastern Massachusetts League of School Publications 
at its mid-winter convention. The most informative part of the program 
was a lecture entitled "Education and the Battle of the Atlantic" by Mr. 
Herbert G. Sonthoff, — the most amusing, the Barbershop Quartet and Mid- 
get Sextet. An Italian supper was served in the cafeteria, and dancing in 
the gymnasium concluded the meeting. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Left to Right: William MacDonald, Elide Benati. Robert Agnone. 
Charles Tourgee 



Miss Jacques. 



Page 68 




CHEERLEADERS 

Left to Right: Marie Sance, Claire Roy, Ann Smith, Lillian Shaw, George Canucci, 

Agnes Emond, Barbara Fish, Arlene O'Brien, Jean Maccaferri 
Absentee: Mr. Guidaboni 




BAND 

Front Row: Howard Haire, Loring Belcher, Frederick Vacchi, Ridhard Drew, David 

Maccaferri, Milton Glassman, Donald Dassman 
Second Row: Melvin Thomas, Donald Meyers, John Kelley, Remo Lodi, Joseph 

Kaiser, Louis Sitta, Alvan Testoni 
Third Row: Harold DeCarli, Gino Borsari, Charles Tourgee, Jane Reynolds, Betty 

Curtin, Charlotte Valler, John Souza, Alvin DeCost, Mr. De Benecuctis 
Fourth Row: Herbert Costa, Lloyd Pickard, David Crawley, Tony Soares, Ralph Bal- 

boni, Frederic Bliss 
Fifth Row: Manuel Silva, Walter St. George, Thomas Brewer, Ch les Stasmos 

Page 69 



Rehearsals for the Gay Nineties Revue were begun with many who 
had never dreamed of participating when the venture was announced, 
hoping, even praying, that they would not be left out. 

The S. A. S. sponsored an assembly at which pictures and a talk on 
modern aircraft were presented by Mr. Murton Overing. 

The Science Club held its Aviation Hop, at which prizes of plane rides 
and defense stamps were given to lucky persons. Since club members dec- 
orated the gymnasium, a few dancers wondered whether they had put some 
of the planes upside down on purpose. 

February — 

It finally happened — the Gay Nineties Revue. All the performers 
hoped that the audience enjoyed it as much as they. 

Because of the change to War Time, it was deemed necessary to start 
school a half hour later in the morning. That half hour proved such a 
short time to remain in bed, but such an eternity at the end of period six! 

The Senior Honor Group, consisting of twenty-one members, each of 
whom has maintained an average of eighty-five per cent or higher 
during the high school course, was announced by Mr. Mongan at an 
assembly. 

The first air raid drill with the evacuation of the building was held on 
a day which was conveniently pleasant and springlike. The people who 
always walk home had an advantage over those who ride, for they were 
winded after the first block or two. 

March — 

The future looked brighter when pupils wrote "March" on their papers 
because this magic word brought with it the realization that there were but 
four months to summer vacation. There were even those who counted the 
intervening days. 




LATIN CLUB (Program Chairmen) 
Front Row: Alvan Testoni, Ruth Morton, Mary Kennedy, Miss Wilber, Anna Scotti, 

Elide Benati, William MacDonald 
Second Row: Isabel Brown, George Canucci. Gerald Longhi, Richard Drew, Philip 

Manchester, Robert Agnone, Arthur Tache, Richard Po, Patricia Malaguti 



Page 70 




LIBRARY STAFF 

Front Row: Shirley Collins, Arleen Linton, Joan Holmes, Mr. Pyle, Florinda Leal, 
Doris Bergonzini, Rachel Baker, Elizabeth Heath 

Second Row: Leonore DeCarli, Marion Clark, Marcia Brooks, Ann Smith, Phyllis 
Ginhold, Mary Goddard, Marie Martinelli, Phyllis Diegoli, Barbara Fish, Mary 
Kennedy, Jennette Franks 

Third Row: Phyllis Lawday, Helene Longhi, Evelyn Ryerson, Norma Johnson, Joseph- 
ine Bassett, Muriel Humphrey, Margaret Diaz, Beatrice O'Connell, Mary Mulcahy, 
Joyce Bassett, Dena Rossi 

Fourth Row: Richard Gavone, David Briggs, Lydia Mongan, Thomas Brewer, Barbara 
Maloon, Edward Cavicchi, Ronald Butterfleld 

Absentees: Elsie Salmi, Betsey McCosh, Mary Donovan, Patricia Douglass 




MIXED CHORUS 
Front Row: Faith Millman, Doris Bergonzini, Louise Thomas, Barbara Carmichael, 

Arlene Bourne, Frances Nutterville, Olive Harlow, Virginia Reynolds 
Second Row: Gladys Cohen, Jane Reynolds, Verna Shaw, Arline White, Marjone 

Neal, Miss Hunt, Phyllis Lawday, Ruth Morton, Nina Patturelh, Florine Schort- 

man' Corinne Jenney, Barbara Fish . 

Third Row: Remo Lodi, Harold Brown, Edwin Baker, Thomas Brewer, David Briggs, 

Alfred Holmes, Edward Penn, Henry Pina 



Page 71 



For the benefit of the Red Cross War Drive, the Gay Nineties Revue 
was repeated. Several members of the cast were surprised to learn how 
much they had forgotten in the space of two weeks. 

At the S. A. S. meeting, two new members were added "to the board 
and one to the council. Twenty per cent of the profit from the Gay Nineties 
Revue was given to the band. 

Graduation plans were begun and the various committees chosen 
when the Senior Honor Group met with Mrs. Miriam Raymond. 

It seemed quite natural to hear Mr. Anson B. Handy speaking at an 
assembly. His talk concerned the problems facing the student after 
graduation. 

At a candlelight assembly, thirteen new members were admitted to 
membership in the National Honor Society. 

The Sophomore Hop was held on the twentieth with musid by Jay 
Mando. 

Sixteen students attended a four-day music festival in Keene, New 
Hampshire. 

Pupils enjoyed another Pitt Parker assembly at which Dan Stiles 
talked about the beauties and industries of coastal New England. His 
exposition was illustrated by pictures in technicolor. 

Many pupils expressed their desire for another assembly of the same 
type as the one presented by the musical groups. In addition to selections 
by glee clubs, band, sextet, and a solo by Fred Bliss, the entire student body 
joined in singing "Rose O'Day," "Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-de-Ay," and several 
other rollicking favorites. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Front Row: Florinda Leal, Marie Martinelli, Ruth Morton. Naomi McNeil, Jean 

Boutin, Doris B'ergonzini 
Second Row: Benjamin Brewster, Roger Whiting, Joseph Tavernelli, Richard Kears- 

ley, Robert MacDonagh, Malcolm Chamberlain, Tony Soares. 
Third Row: Laura Resnick, Anna Scotti, Robert Wilson. Jennette Franks. Richard 

Wirtzburger, Mr. Mongan, George Canucci, Harold DeCarli, Lydia Mongan, Faith 

Millman 
Absentees: Mr. Romano, Mr. Guidaboni 



Page 72 




CRAFTS 

Front Row: Evelyn Ryerson, Phyllis Ginhold, Agnes Emond, Barbara Pish, Mildred 
Schaal 

Second Row: Doris Volta, Joan Chiari, Elaine Sadow, Mary Mulcahy, Patricia Doug- 
lass, Justine Hayward, Marie Martinelli 

Absentee: Mrs. Brown 




PRESS CLUB 

Front Row: Barbara Lee, Robert MacDonagh, Doris Bergonzini, Margaret Diaz, 

Walter Silva, Rose Brigida, Gladys Cohen 
Second Row: Elizabeth Heath, Jane Reynolds, Helen Sherman, Phyllis Lawday, Miss 

Moore, Joyce Bassett, Constance Armstrong, Mary Bearhope, Mildred Schaal, 

Olive Harlow 

Page 73 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Front Row: Naomi McNeil, William Lamborghini 

Back Row: Benjamin Brewster, Miss Lang, Paul Brewster 



The Class of 1943 met to discuss plans for its Junior Promenade sched- 
uled for May fifteenth. 

Girls' badminton was played in the gymnasium three days each week. 

April — 

Six war news films were presented by the music department on the 
evening of the seventeenth to raise money to pay for the band's new 
uniforms. 

Prizes were awarded in the Motion Picture Poster Contest sponsored 
by the Plymouth Woman's Club. Marie Martinelli received first, Patricia 
Douglass, second, and Nancy Bartlett and Benjamin Perry tied for third. 
The posters were made in the Art Department under the supervision of 
Mrs. Margaret Brown. The judges were Mrs. Daniel Ellis, Miss Nellie 
Locklin, and Mrs. Miriam Raymond. 

Well, dear Diary, a most significant date has arrived — the day when 
The Pilgrim goes to press. Although the school year has two more months 
to run, these entries must be brought to an abrupt conclusion. 

A fond adieu, 

Ruth Morton '43 



We hope that our readers will do unto Our Advertisers 
as they have done by us. 



Page 74 



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For present pleasure and future pride protect 
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84 Summer St. 



WHITNEY SHIRTS 



MALLORY HATS 



PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WM. CAVICCHI, Proprietor 
Telephone 341 18 Main Street 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

Inquire About Our Special Offer on Suits for Graduation 



MANHATTAN SHIRTS 



CHARACTER CLOTHES 



ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

Beauty Shop 



Room 10 



Buttner Building 
PLYMOUTH 



GAMBINI'S 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

LUNCHEONETTE 



Tel. 372 



52 Main St. 



SHERMAN'S 



PLYMOUTH 



NORTH PLYMOUTH 



// it's new 



you'll find it at . . . 

GRANT'S 



THE VALUE SPOT IN PLYMOUTH 



LEONORE'S 

BEAUTY SALON 

46 Main St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1116-W 



DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

OPTOMETRIST 

12 Main St. Plymouth 

Telephone 658 



M. D. COSTA 

FRUITS AND 
VEGETABLES 



Tel. 669 



40 Court St. 



EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main Street 

ENNA-JETTICK SHOE STORE 

EDDIE HAND, Manager 



CECCARELLI 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

CLEANSERS FURRIERS 

We operate our own Cleansing Plant on Premises. 
Same Day Service — We Call For and Deliver. 



301 Court Street 



Tel. 941 



NORTH PLYMOUTH 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET 



Tel. 261 



Main St. Ext. 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING -- HEATING 

PAINT and HARDWARE SUPPLIES 

Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 



CARROLL 

Cut-Rate Perfumer 

COMPLETE STOCK OF COSMETICS 
and PATENT MEDICINES 



47 Main St. 



Next to Fire Station 



W. R. Davis H. S. Hatch 

Davis & Morgan Electric Co. 

Electrical Problems Honestly Solved 
DEPENDABLE WIRING 

Plymouth Since 1919 Tel. 290 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 

A. PERRY RICHARDS 

President 



Federalized 1937 

ROBERT J. TUBBS 

Vice-President — Treasurer 



WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 





SAFETY is 
INSURED 



INSURED 



pnepatejoi Winie/t ^ 



*\.00 stt^ 



at\a cC 



ou^ 



CaH or Write for Information 



Plymouth Co-operative 
[ Federal Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

fortt/'four Main St, 

Pit/mouth, Massachusetts. 



CAPE FUEL MART 

PLYMOUTH 

To Buy Your Winter's Fuel Supply, Ask About Our 

NEW FUEL BUDGET PLAN 



NEW ENGLAND COKE 



FIREPLACE WOOD 



NEW RIVER 
BITUMINOUS 



KINDLING 



RANGE OIL 
FUEL OIL 



Distributors for 

FAMOUS READING ANTHRACITE 

The low-ash hard coal laundered and trade-marked for your protection. 



Yankee Clipper 
CRUISERS 

Built by 

THOMAS T. PARKER, INC. 

WATER STREET 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 265 

— o — 

Hauling . . . Storage 
BROKERAGE 



JIM'S 
Restaurant 



Incorporated 



FINE FOODS 
Our Specialty 



7 Main Street 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 1187-W 



MAROIS MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS 



Tel. 1250 



187 Court St. 



HOUSE Th t e h BLUE BLINDS 

7 North St., Plymouth 
Tel. 1149 



Breakfast - Dinner - Supper 

Home-cooked Bread, Cakes 
and Pastry 

JOHN and CONSTANCE KENNY 



You will always find "Jack" 

At Your Service Now As Ever at 

South Shore's Finest 

• CLEANERS 

• TAILORS 

• FURRIERS 



PURITAN 

TAILORING 
DEPARTMENT 

56 Main Street 
PLYMOUTH 



Brockton 
Business College 

Intensive Training for 

BUSINESS and GOVERNMENT 
SERVICE 

Send for 51st Year Catalogue 
GEORGE E. BIGELOW, Principal 

226 Main St. BROCKTON 

Telephone 635 



EDYTHES 

BEAUTY SHOPPE 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



If it's New and Smart, 
you'll find it at 

SYLVIA'S MILLINERY SHOP 

(Former Location of Children's Shop) 
18 Court St. Plymouth 



"Plymouth's Modern Store for 
Men and Boys" 

— o — 

— WE FEATURE — 

Adams Hats 

Florsheim Shoes 

Clippercraft Clothes 

Arrow Shirts 

Interwoven Hose 

— o — 

PURITAN 

CLOTHING CO. 

"Home of Dependability" 
56 Main St. PLYMOUTH 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
HARDWARE CO. 

62 Court St. PLYMOUTH 
Telephone 950 


Edes 

Manufacturing 

Co. 


Congratulations — Class of '4,2 

HOWARD JOHNSON'S 

OF PLYMOUTH 


DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 
THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 
PLYMOUTH 


LEWIS' 

DRY GOODS 

WALLPAPERS 

KYANIZE PAINTS 
13 Court St. PLYMOUTH 


GOODING'S 

Diamonds - Watches - Silverware 
Expert Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Plymouth's Leading Jewelry Store 
for 140 years 

4 Main St. Tel. 429 Plymouth 


DR. S. S. HIRSON 


Best Wishes 

PERSONAL FINANCE COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH. MASS. 



Learn 



Beauty Culture 



at 

WILFRED 
ACADEMY 

We train 

you in a 

short time 

at low cost. 

Ideal 
positions, 
good pay and 
advancement 
await you in 
either war or 
peace time. 

There is a 
shortage of 
experienced 

operators. 



Write for 1942 Catalog H 

Day and Evening Classes begin each 

week. Visit our classes in session and 

see our employment records. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 

492 Boylston St. Boston, Mass. 

Ken. 0880 




Official P. H. S. 
Class PINS 

Jeivelers 

28 Main Street PLYMOUTH 



C. PAUL 

For Your SHOES 
and REPAIRING 

Honest Values 

Dependable Service 



53 Court St. 



PLYMOUTH 



KAY'S CUT - RATE 

67 Main St., Corner North 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 

LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN 



SIBLEY'S SHOE STORE 

Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 
AIR- STEP Shoes for Women 

ROBLEE Shoes for Men 

BUSTER BROWN Shoes for 

Boys and Girls 

If It's New, It's at Sibley's 

11 Court Street 



GUY W. 

COOPER 



GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 

Location 

JABEZ CORNER 

PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 258 



Northeastern University 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers for young men a broad pro- 
gram of college subjects serving as a 
foundation for the understanding of 
modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. Students may 
concentrate in any of the following 
fields: Biology, Chemistry, Economics, 
Sociology, Psychology, Mathematics, 
Physics, and English (including an 
option in Journalism). 

Pre-medical, Pre-Dental and Pre-Legal 
courses are offered. Varied opportunities 
available for vocational specialization. De- 
gree : Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of 



College of Engineering 

Offers for. young men curricula in 
Civil, Mechanical (with Air-Condi- 
tioning, and Aeronautical options), 
Electrical, Chemical, and Industrial 
Engineering. Classroom study is sup- 
plemented by experiment and re- 
search in well-equipped laboratories. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in the 
professional field of specialization. 



College of Business Administration 

Offers for young men six curricula: Accounting, Banking and 
Finance, Marketing and Advertising, Journalism, Public Adminis- 
tration, and Industrial Administration. Each curriculum provides 
a sound training in the fundamentals of business practice and 
culminates in special courses devoted to the various professional 
fields. Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



School of Law 

Offers three-year day and four-year 
evening undergraduate programs 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. A minimum of one-half of the 
work accepted for a bachelor's degree 
in an approved college or its full 
equivalent required for admission to 
undergraduate programs. Case 
method of instruction. 

The school also offers a two-year evening 
program open to graduates of approved law 
schools and leading to the degree of Master 
of Laws. Under-graduate and graduate 
programs admit men and women. 



School of Business 

Offers curricula through evening 
classes in Accounting, Industrial 
Management, Distributive Manage- 
ment, and Engineering and Business, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Business Administration in specified 
fields. Preparation for C. P. A. Exam- 
inations. A special four-year curric- 
ulum in Law and Business Manage- 
ment leading to the Bachelor of Com- 
mercial Science degree with appro- 
priate specification is also offered. 
Shorter programs may be arranged. 
Co-educational. 



Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during 
evening hours affording concentration in Economics, English, 
History and Government or Social Service. 

A special orogram preparing for admissiort to the School of Law is also 
available. The nrogiam is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement 
for the A.B. or S.B. degree. Associate in Arts title conferred. Co-educational. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering and Business Administration offer 
day programs for men only, and are conducted on the co-operative plan. 
After the freshman year, students may alternate their periods of study wit/h 
periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns at ten-week 
intervals. Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large 

part of their college expenses. 

FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts: Please send me a catalog of the 



[ ] 

[ ] 
[ ] 

[ J 
L 1 

Name 



College of Liberal Arts [ 1 

College of Engineering 
College of Business Adminis- 
tration 

School of Law t 1 

Evening School of Business 



Evening — College of Liberal 

Arts 

Day Pre -Medical Program 

Day Pre-Dental Program 

Day and Evening Pre-Legal 

Programs 



Address 

C-114 



WHITE HORSE PLAYLAND 



GEORGE KELLAR, Proprietor 



McCLELLAN'S 


SEARS FUEL CO. 


Quality Merchandise 


Coal -- Coke •- Charcoal 


at Low Prices 


Range and Fuel Oil 




Tel. 1214-W 


PLYMOUTH 


Lothrop St. PLYMOUTH 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardivare Store for 117 Years 

PAINTS - HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 
PLUMBING -- HEATING -- SHEET METAL WORK 



1 Main Street. Plymouth 
Telephone 283 



BALBONI'S DRUG STORE 

"The Drug Store that' Serves Plymouth" 
U. S. POSTAL STATION NO. 2 

Prescriptions Accurately Filled 
Free Delivery 

JOSEPH BALBONI 

Registered Pharmacist 

Telephone 1231-1057 317 Court St. 

For Night Service Call 432-W 



SILVIO LEONARDI 

PIONEER 
FOOD STORE 



298 Court St. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 53 



FREDERIC A. BLISS 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

SHEET METAL WORK 

Opp. Old Colony Theatre 



BLISS HARDWARE 

COMPANY, INC. 



Garden Tools 
DuPont Paints 
Locksmiths 



Telephone 825 



Fertilizers 

Norge Washers 

Builders' Hardware 

PLYMOUTH 



F. W. W00LW0RTH CO. 



PLYMOUTH ROCK ALLEYS 

Open Sundays — 1 p.m. to 12 p.m. 
Open Daily — 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 



Opposite Railroad Station 



Tel. Plymouth 855 



H. H. RAYMOND 



F. E. LESLIE, Druggist 

A Nice Little Drug Store 
in a Nice Little Town 



Tel. 358 



22 Court St. 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 

ROGER S. KELLEN 

Dealer in Old Violins 
Expert Repairing 

9 Winslow St. Tel. 1420 Plymouth 



CASTLE MOTORS 

DESOTO — PLYMOUTH 

Authorized Sales and Service 

120 Sandwich Street Plymouth 



A. R. PARKER CO. 
The Best MILK To Buy 



EAST BRIDGEWATER, MASS. 



Before you buy any Refrigerator 
Be sure you look at our 1942 Air-Conditioned 

ICE REFRIGERATOR 

• • • 

With Ice You Get All 5 Advantages 

ECONOMY — PROPER MOISTURE — CONSTANT COLD 
CLEANED, WASHED AIR — ICE CUBES 



Remember — Cold alone is not enough 



CAPE REFRIGERATING CO. 



Plant at ,^-\ flfoltM Telephone 

HEDGE ROAD ^nOJlW/l^^ Plymouth 

Plymouth lH*^ 16 



BAILEY MOTOR SALES, INC. 

Telephone 1090 
114 Sandwich Street PLYMOUTH 

BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and Service 
G.M.C. TRUCK SALES and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best-equipped 

service stations in the vicinity . . . 24-hour service . . . Open 

day and night . . . Agents for Delco Batteries. 

DON'T FORGET: 

All of Our Repairvvork is Guaranteed 



A Fine Selection of 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 

to choose from at all times 



rr in ting. . . 




is an investment designed to accom- 
plish some definite purpose — 

W/HETHER that purpose be to stimulate 
" sales ... or to build prestige ... its 
value to you lies not in its cost . . . but in 
what it accomplishes and the results it attains. . . . 

When in the market for printing that pays dividends 
in prestige and results, consult our Creative Service 
Department for ideas, suggestions . . . and estimates . . . 



The MEMORIAL PRESS 

PRINTERS - - PUBLISHERS - - BOOKBINDERS 

MIDDLE STREET ??-« PLYMOUTH 



WILLIAM H. FRANKS, JR. 

INSURANCE 

101 Milk Street, Boston 


DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 


DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 


DUNLAP 

OIL SERVICE 

GULF PETROLEUM 

SERVICE STATION 

Tel. 1278 23 Sandwich St. 


Relief for Acid Stomach 

BISMA - REX 

Four-Action Antacid Powder 

Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas 

Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50? 


Save with Safety at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy Rexall Stores" 

Abington — No. Abington — Rockland 

"In Plymouth It's Cooper's 


ALPHONSO'S BODY REPAIR 

BEAR WHEEL ALIGNING 

51V2 Samoset Street PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 300-W Alphonso Chiari 


REBUTTINI'S 

FOOD STORE 

53 Court St. PLYMOUTH 

Telephones 565-374 


VERRE'S BARBER SHOP 

3 Barbers 
Hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

52 Sandwich St. PLYMOUTH 



Dutton Motor Car Co. 

115 Sandwich Street 



CADILLAC 



OLDSMOBILE 



Tel. 1500 



SALES 



SERVICE 



PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY CO. 

— o 

Ride Our Modern 
Air-Conditioned Buses 



Sandwich St. 



PLYMOUTH 



O. R. SAYRE 



FRED REGGIANI 



First National Stores 



4 North Street 



PLYMOUTH 



LINCOLN ST. SERVICE STATION 



PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone 79 



PRISCILLA MAID 
WEAVERS 

Congratulations to the 
Senior Class 

f rarilia Mmh 

Hand Weavers 

THE TIE SHOP 

PLYMOUTH 



CONTENTE SHOE STORE 

SHOES FOR 
ALL THE FAMILY 

Better Shoes for Less Money 

Tel. 733-W 301 Court Street 

NORTH PLYMOUTH 



Nook Farm Dairy 



MILK 

and Cream 

♦ 

HEALTH 
BUILDER 



. . . Local Milk . . . 

Taste the difference from a modern dairy 




TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 



CHOCOLATE • ORANGE • COFFEE 



NOOK ROAD Telephone: Plymouth 1261 PLYMOUTH 



MITCHELL -THOMAS CO., INC. 

Furniture - Wallpaper - Paints 

66 Court Street PLYMOUTH 

Clothes for Graduation 

Suits Sport Coats 

White Flannels Sport Slacks 

Shirts Sweaters 

Hosiery Ties 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 
Court Street PLYMOUTH 

Petroleum Sales and Service, Inc. 

Agents for 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

Hedge Road PLYMOUTH 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 

MISS EVA BORSARI 



391 Court Street, North Plymouth 
Telephone 615 



BURBANK'S 

great Gift Shop 



BURBANK'S, INC. 

19 - 21 COURT STREET 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

"The Nation's Birthplace" 



To the Graduating Class 
of Plymouth High School: 



\V7E extend our sincere congratulations on the com- 
pletion of your school course and express our best 
wishes for your future. 



At this time, we wish to thank you for your 
loyalty to us. We trust we may merit your 
continued patronage. 



BUTTNER'S 



OF PLYMOUTH 



Donovan & Sullivan 

Engraving Company 



PHOTO-ENGRAVERS 



470 Atlantic Avenue Boston, Mass. 

Harbor Building Lib. 8 7 1 1 



Represented by . . . 

P. V. CARTER, Pembroke, Mass. 



DUTCHLAND 

ROUTE 3 — KINGSTON 

COMPLETE LUNCHEONS and DINNERS 

AND ALWAYS 

DUTCHLAND FARM ICE CREAM 

LeVs Go To Dutchland! 



WALK-OVER SSL 

65 Main Street, PLYMOUTH 



AGENTS FOR 

Walk-Over Shoes 

Bass Moccasins 

Kamp Tramps 
Arnold and Stetson Shoes 
Goodrich Line of 
Sneakers and Rubbers 

D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 



D. E. REID 

Wholesale 
Confectionery 

Candy is a Delicious Food. 
Eat Some Every Day. 

Paper Specialties 



Tel. 1081-M 



5 Willard Place 



CONVENIENT 
ECONOMICAL 

LAUNDRY SERVICE 



"We put new life in old shoes' 



PLYMOUTH 
SHOE HOSPITAL 



(SHi (ftnlmty Hamtury 



Tel. 272 



Howland St. 



63 ' 2 Main Street PLYMOUTH 



• Best Wishes to the • 
GRADUATING CLASS 



Plymouth County Electric Company 



Main Street Extension 



PLYMOUTH 



Telephone 1300 



CURRIER'S 

RESTAURANT 
and ICE CREAM SHOP 

Local Dealer for 
WHITMAN AND KEMP PRODUCTS 



63 Main St. 



PLYMOUTH 



— Phone 406 — 

Hours: 9:30 to 12:00 — 1:30 to 5:00 
and by Appointment 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 

Russell Bids. Plymouth 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
SPECIALTIES 



1 Warren Ave. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1298-W 



MAYFLOWER CLEANSERS 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 

TAILORS 

Cleaning — Pressing — Repairing 



Emond Bldg. 



Tel. 1240 



PLYMOUTH 



ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 
QUALITY FURNITURE 

Upholstering — Bedding 
Norge — Gibson — Crosley Refrigerators 

Tel. 1485 84 Court St. 



LEO'S 

Barber and Beauty Shops 
Plymouth and Duxbury 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Plymouth Rock 
GROCERY 

FRESH FRUIT 
and VEGETABLES 



117 Sandwich St. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 1198 



VOLTA MUSIC SHOP 

VICTOR -- BLUEBIRD -- DECCA 
COLUMBIA -- OKEH RECORDS 

Classical and Popular 

PHONOGRAPH ALBUMS AND SUPPLIES 

297 Court St. NO. PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 840-W 



GUaaa of 1942 



Class Colors 

Blue and Silver 



Class Motto 
With Courage and Confidence 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS